Category Archives: Recipes

Grilled Chicken and Romaine with Caper Dressing

By Monica Reinagel

brought to you by epicurious.com and NutritionData.com

Calories 446; Total Fat 30g; Carbohydrates 12g

Capers and shallots flavor a simple but rich-tasting vinaigrette that serves as marinade and salad dressing for this warm salad. The low-carb meal provides plenty of protein, antioxidants, and bone-strengthening vitamin K, and most of the fat is from the olive-oil-based sauce, so it’s the healthy, monounsaturated kind.

Go to the healthy recipe on epicurious.com

Nutritional Information

Amounts per serving plus the % Daily Value (DV) based on a 2,000 calorie diet:

  • 446 Calories (22%)
  • 30g Total fat (46%)
  • 5g Saturated Fat (23%)
  • 71mg Cholesterol (24%)
  • 359mg Sodium (15%)
  • 12g Carbohydrate (4%)
  • 7g Fiber (27%)
  • 32g Protein (64%)

See the full nutritional analysis from NutritionData.com

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Source: Epicurious

A Brief Pastry Tour of Lisbon

By Lauren Salkeld Clockwise from top left: Queijada de Sintra, pastéis de Belém, pao de deus tabuleiro Maybe it’s the fact that my Facebook newsfeed is filled with photos of friends traveling in Europe, or perhaps it’s just a regular summer slump, but lately I’ve been thinking about my last vacation, a week spent in Lisbon this past March. While the trip’s leisurely pace and no-cell-phone-or-Internet-style relaxation come to mind, mostly I’m reminiscing about all the new things I got to see and, if I’m honest, even more so about all the new food I got to try. There was a lot, including at least five of Portugal’s legendary 365 ways to prepare bacalhau. But if I had to pick a theme for the trip, it would be pastry. I knew from fellow Epi-Log contributor Carolina Santos-Neves that the Portuguese have a fondness for egg-filled desserts, so I anticipated lots of custards and enriched baked goods. Plus, as soon as I started mentioning my upcoming trip, Portugal fans immediately insisted I had to go to the Antigua Confeitaria de Belém to try their famous pastéis de Belém, small crisp pastry shells filled with (surprise, surprise) a luscious egg-y custard, and dusted in powdered sugar and cinnamon. As David Leite explains in his culinary guide to Portugal, “These treats are so sought after that it is illegal for any other shop to sell anything called pastéis de Belém; pretenders to the throne must call theirs pastéis de nata.” The bakery can be quite popular. According to Leite, they shape, fill, and bake more than 10,000 pastéis de Belém a day. We were lucky to encounter only a short line in Belém, though I’m sure I would have waited if necessary. I may balk at lines at home in New York, but on vacation, when I worry about never making it back, I’m usually game for a little waiting in line. We encountered another famous pastry in Sintra, a castle-filled town that’s a quick 40-minute train ride from Lisbon. Like pastéis de Belém, Sintra’s specialty, queijadas, are also made in other places. I haven’t heard of any legal claims to the name, but it seems generally accepted that Sintra’s version is the best. The similarities don’t stop there: Queijadas also feature a thin pastry shell filled with custard, but the pastry is thinner and a little less sweet. The filling is also less sweet, probably because it includes fresh cheese (something along the lines of ricotta), and has a firmer texture than the soft custard in the pastéis de Belém. If forced to choose, I’d probably pick Sintra’s queijadas over the pastéis de Belém, but the award for favorite goes to another, less-well-known pastry. At breakfast at Padaria Portuguesa, which has multiple locations in Lisbon, we discovered pão de deus tabuleiro. I’ve yet to find a decent translation for this coconut-infused pastry, reminiscent of an enriched bread dough, something along the lines of brioche, but more delicate and crumbly. The unique texture was probably what…<div …read more

Source: Epicurious

When Enough Is Enough: Resisting Upselling

By Regina Schrambling Last night I realized there’s one more good reason to become a regular at a restaurant. It makes it so much easier, not to mention more dignified, to resist the inevitable upselling. This was at a newish, constantly packed place we’ve managed to get into four or five times, and we were with friends on their maiden voyage through the menu. My consort knew to take charge of the wine and order the cheaper big-A carafe of rosé because we might want a second, sitting out there on the sidewalk in the setting sun. So when the very charming waiter instead recommended the Provencal that “most people seem to prefer” over the just-okay New York State one we’d chosen, he said thanks but no thanks. Not for 20 bucks more. And it was the same after we’d ordered our main courses. The very charming waiter was very persuasive that we should add some garlic spinach or crushed Brussels sprouts or Mexican corn off the cob. But I intervened to say there would be more than enough food on our plates as it was. Every time we’ve eaten there we’ve come home with a heavy kittybag. (My two fat fillets of trout Milanese were layered over fingerlings, fried artichokes, pickled onions and aioli for all of $25.) Given how generous the affordable portions are, it makes sense that the place makes its money with the add-ons. Especially given that most patrons probably go there for the oldest reason in the restaurant profession: Location, location, location (near Lincoln Center). So I didn’t mind a practice that’s normally annoying. And I definitely didn’t blame that very charming waiter. He was only doing his job, and well. It’s just that a little knowledge is not always a dangerous thing.

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Source: Epicurious

Food in the Garden

By Tanya Steel Yes, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History in Washington D.C. has the actual Star Spangled Banner. Yes, it has Dorothy’s ruby slippers. Yes, it even has Julia Child’s kitchen, down to the drawer knob. But now it also has a Victory Garden, which is doubling as an herbaceous-smelling site for a summer-long program of talks, tastes, and tours. “The inspiration for Food in the Garden grew out of our desire to extend the themes and reach of the Food exhibition,” says curator Paula Johnson. “We’re focusing on ‘Growing Local,’ and we’ve had terrific panels on heirlooms (old, new, local, global) and foraging. Essentially, the garden series expands our timeframe to the present, and invites a new audience to share in the conversations.” Each Thursday, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., food and garden lovers can learn from, and interact with, experts on various topics: Tomorrow, August 1, focuses on the importance of community and schoolyard gardens, and how they can be an agent of change and activism. Next Thursday, August 8, you can get dirty, as the focus shifts to soil, fertilizers, and composting. On August 15, the museum will celebrate Julia Child’s 101st birthday with a showing of “Julie & Julia.” Sponsored by the Julia Child Foundation for Gastronomy and the Culinary Arts and DuPont Pioneer, tickets are a very good value–$20, and include two cocktails plus fresh-from-the-garden nibbles.

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Source: Epicurious

The Next Big Thing? Celtuse!

By Kemp Minifie Psst…Want the scoop on the next vegetable craze? It’s likely to be celtuse, (pronounced sell-TOOSE). Never heard of it? Neither had I until I stopped by Rick Bishop’s Mountain Sweet Berry Farm stand last Saturday. He pulled out a giant stalk of lettuce that was naked except for a birdlike plume of leaves at the top. “You eat the stalk,” explained Bishop, “but make sure you peel it first.” Well-known chefs Dan Barber and Wylie Dufresne were using it. Chef Barber of Blue Hill and Blue Hill at Stone Barns in Pocantico Hills, New York, was quick to give credit to Jack Algiere, the Stone Barns Center Four Season Farm Director, for what Barber calls the celtuse craze. Algiere remembers the day he first introduced celtuse to Barber’s kitchen staff as an almost magical moment of coincidence and synergy. It was 2005, a year after Barber’s Blue Hill at Stone Barns had opened, and Algiere was still experimenting with different seeds. He walked into the restaurant kitchen one day with a surprise: huge stems of Laotian stalk lettuce–also known as asparagus lettuce–looking just like what I’d bought at Bishop’s stand. The stalks were definitely new and unusual to everyone, except sous chef Adam Kaye, who had literally just walked into the kitchen himself from a trip to France. “Oh, I just had that,” said Kaye, and proceeded to show the crew pictures of the very same vegetable in Parisian markets. Algiere was given the seeds by his close friend William Woys Weaver, a food historian, professor, and seed breeder/saver. Algiere describes him as “a brilliant man with a lot of history in his mind…who shared things in his seed vault that he thought would be good to keep perpetuating.” Algiere was the right man to do it. At first Algiere had a hard time sourcing more seeds. The best he’s found are from Agrohaitai, a Canadian company specializing in Asian seeds. They sell three different types that Algiere either grows outside or in a greenhouse, allowing him to supply it year round. Celtuse is unusual in that it’s eaten in the bolting stage, unlike other lettuces, which are eaten in the vegetative state. The celtuse leaves can be a bit bitter, but not nearly as much as a head of romaine that’s gone to flower. Algiere loves the leaves in a salad. Although Algiere appreciates how juicy and crisp the celtuse stem is when raw, he prefers it either roasted or grilled, which brings out its nutty flavor. He’s actually tried to increase that nutty quality by adding nut pressings—what remains after making nut oils—to the soil. Meanwhile, Wylie Dufresne of WD-50 and Jon Bignelli, executive chef of Alder, Dufresne’s new East Village restaurant, are both enthusiastic fans of celtuse. “It’s really refreshing with just a scootch of bitter flavor,” says Bignelli, who makes a purée of it with white wine, clam stock, heavy cream, potatoes, shallots, and dill to serve with fried squash blossoms that have been stuffed with…<div …read more

Source: Epicurious

MasterChef Home Cook Challenge

By Carla Prieto You can make the same dish for your loved ones before tonight’s episode of MasterChef as the contestants made for theirs thanks to a recipe shared exclusively with us. The families of the remaining seven home cooks will be dropping in on this week’s challenge. The contestants will cook a meal for their loved ones, and the competitor with the best home-cooked meal will select the teams for the ensuing tag-team sushi challenge. The team with the least impressive sushi dish will face elimination. Exclusive recipe to try: -Pan-Seared Halibut with White Asparagus Risotto and Pea Purée See which chef’s family-inspired dish will help him or her to the next round at 9 p.m. ET/8 p.m. CT on FOX. (Photo: Greg Gayne/FOX)

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Source: Epicurious

Grilled Lemons, Baby Artichokes, and Eggplant

By Monica Reinagel

brought to you by epicurious.com and NutritionData.com

Calories 152; Total Fat 5g; Carbohydrates 27g

Here’s an easy, low-calorie side dish to grill alongside chicken, fish, or a vegetarian main like tempeh. Artichokes and eggplant are both high in fiber, which may help lower cholesterol levels. Fiber also helps keep your weight down (by filling you up so you won’t overeat). Most Americans don’t get nearly enough of it. Eggplant also contains antioxidant compounds that have been shown to lower elevated cholesterol. While the grill is warm, prepare grilled rum-basted pineapple.

Go to the healthy recipe on epicurious.com

Nutritional Information

Amounts per serving plus the % Daily Value (DV) based on a 2,000 calorie diet:

  • 152 Calories (8%)
  • 5g Total fat (8%)
  • 1g Saturated Fat (4%)
  • 0mg Cholesterol (0%)
  • 124mg Sodium (5%)
  • 27g Carbohydrate (9%)
  • 13g Fiber (53%)
  • 6g Protein (12%)

See the full nutritional analysis from NutritionData.com

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Source: Epicurious

Personal Best Pesto Recipes

By Patricia Reilly My passion for pesto knows no season, but of course now is prime time for basil, in the Northeast at least. Lucky for those of like minds, Epicurious offers almost 250 pesto recipes of one sort or another, whether for pasta, or as a panino’s best friend, or slathered atop grilled halibut on a bed of bright arugula. Even when speaking strictly of basil pesto–leaving aside the mint, arugula, broccoli rabe, and other green forms of the paste–the variety of methods and ingredients in this Liguria-inspired sauce is enough to spark passionate arguments among purists. Pesto plurality has been a good thing in my case, though, now that I’ve deliberately gone back to the books on pesto in recent summers. A few years ago, I began to feel that I’d lost my groove with my own tossed-together version of this summer staple, and I decided to undertake some pesto re-education. First stop was Marcella Hazan, and I dutifully made and remade the Blender Pesto in her Classic Italian Cookbook–a longtime touchstone–searching for the Proustian pesto of my youth. Maybe the secret was the way she beats the cheese and then the butter in by hand at the end, I thought. For a while this version did seem to do the trick, especially when served the really old-fashioned way, with potatoes and green beans to hearty things up. Then last summer, my colleague Kemp Minifie’s pesto won me over in a big way. A cup of parsley to two of basil really makes the flavor pop, and the pepitas she uses suit me better than pine nuts ever did. And Kemp’s recipe explains the essential step it took me too long to learn: introducing some of the pasta cooking water into the pesto, to thin it and warm it and marry it with the pasta. Trying new recipes has gotten me out of my rut. Now I’ve got several pestos I like, and I’m back tossing things into the food processor and experimenting more confidently. Last week, living dangerously, I reversed Hazan’s rule and threw right into the maw of the machine a hunk of yellow Irish sweet butter. To my delight, this pesto came the closest yet to the slightly creamy, bright-green mixture I’d been searching for, vivid in flavor yet mild on the tongue. Speaking of mellow, I just discovered a surprising footnote to Johanne Killeen and George Germon’s recipe for Linguine with Classic Ligurian Pesto in their On Top of Spaghetti…: “A little milk softens and mellows pesto, taking away any hard edges.” In a recipe scaled to a pound of pasta, the authors offer the option of folding a tablespoon or two of whole milk into the pesto along with the softened butter. Has anyone tried that? What’s the gold standard in the green stuff for you? Basil, parsley, both? Pine nuts, pepitas, or nut-free à la pistou? Blender? Food processor? Anyone swear by a mortar and pestle?

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Source: Epicurious

Preserving Summer's Harvest

By Sara Bonisteel With so much delicious stonefruit at the farmers’ market, the question is often what can’t summer’s bounty be used for? Over on Bon Appetit, they’re turning plums in to plum cordial. Alison Roman’s recipe calls for 2 pounds of tiny red plums, a bottle of vodka, and a cup of sugar. Yum. You can do the same thing with cherries. Try this Cherry Vodka recipe. Our Community Table partners are also getting into preservation. Food Fanatic celebrates the birth of Prince George with a Cherries Jubilee Jam recipe that spotlights sweet cherries. Cherries Jubilee gained popularity during Queen Victoria’s reign. In Paris, Mayu’s Kitchen turns fresh peaches into compote suitable for a croissant. And remember, you can make the most out of berries and fresh herbs too. Perpetually Chic uses them in her Infused Simple Syrups. (Photo: Matt Duckor)

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Source: Epicurious

Fake Restaurant Garners Great Reviews

By Joanne Camas Ever base your restaurant choice on user-submitted online reviews? Wondered what those people were thinking? Well, The Telegraph reported yesterday on the disgruntled friend of a hotel owner who suspected rival eateries were panning his buddy’s place. He retaliated by making up a restaurant to highlight the dubious nature of some online reviews. “Oscar’s” had “mind-blowing” Michelin-star-earning food to rival the world’s best, according to its profile on TripAdvisor, and was set in a picturesque fishing village in Devon, England. In reality, though, diners turned up to find the address was just a deserted alley. “Upon investigation, as this property doesn’t meet our listing guidelines, the listing has been removed,” a TripAdvisor spokesman told The Telegraph. I guess a restaurant has to actually exist to justify its place in the listings. As one fake review of Oscar’s had noted, “there is an unbelievable quality about it.” No doubt the duped diners who traipsed there will concur. Do you post reviews of restaurants online? And do you read other people’s reviews to get a sense of a restaurant? How accurate do you find user reviews?

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Source: Epicurious

Iced Coffee on the Road

By Sara Bonisteel I’ve been drinking cold-brew iced coffee year-round since college, and so when I travel, it is always a challenge to find a suitable substitute that is as smooth and strong as my coffee back home. I like cold coffee. I like it because it takes less time to consume than hot coffee. Caffeination comes quickly. I use a Toddy maker at home (shown bottom right). It’s basically a plastic bucket with a filter in the bottom that holds a pound of coffee grounds and 10-12 cups of water. You let it steep overnight and filter the coffee concentrate into a glass carafe that can sit in the fridge for up to two weeks. You’re supposed to water down the concentrate before adding milk and/or sugar. I’ve been drinking it so long that I drink the concentrate watered down with just milk. One of my big complaints with ordering an iced coffee from anywhere besides my home (or the coffeeshops of New Orleans) is that it’s often made from hot coffee that’s just refrigerated. Which tastes exactly how you’d expect it too … like stale, acidic coffee. Yesterday’s brew. A three-month stint in London–where the coffee culture in the late 1990s was basically packets of Nespresso freeze-dried crystals–forced me to learn to like *gasp* espresso over ice. In a pinch, I’ll drink a few shots of this bitter brew, cut with a little skim milk. I still do this at turnpike Starbucks when necessary. But lately, I’m finding that there are more good coffee options out there for iced-coffee lovers on the go. By far my favorite is Cool Brew, a cold coffee concentrate sold at grocery stores in Louisiana. The 500ml container makes 16 coffees, and if it weren’t for TSA travel restrictions on liquids, I would bring back bottles and bottles. This is as good or better than most coffeeshop cold brews. (And it’s available online.) Barnies CoffeeKitchen recently released Pronto!, an individual serving concentrate that comes in seven flavors. The portable sleeves make it an easy win for road trips. The packets work out to be about a dollar a piece. A third option is finding the local coffee chain in the region where you’re traveling. Growlers of cold brew travel well in a cooler, and will get you caffeinated faster than that hot sludge they’re serving at the gas station. Are you a cold-brew fan? How do you cope while traveling? (All photos by Sara Bonisteel except for Cool Brew)

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Source: Epicurious

Grilled Rainbow Chard with Fava Beans and Oregano

By Monica Reinagel

brought to you by epicurious.com and NutritionData.com

Calories 118; Total Fat 7g; Carbohydrates 11g

Here’s a stunning and tasty dish that uses the colorful and nutrient-packed center ribs of rainbow chard, a part of the vegetable that often gets tossed out. The brightly colored stems are rich in carotenoids, members of the vitamin A family. Serve the chard ribs and favas as a side dish for grilled chicken or steak, or toss with pasta for a simple vegetarian main. You can save the leaves for another meal, or sauté them in olive oil and serve as a complementary side dish. For dessert, have a bowl of cherries.

Go to the healthy recipe on epicurious.com

Photograph By: Mikkel Vang

Nutritional Information

Amounts per serving plus the % Daily Value (DV) based on a 2,000 calorie diet:

  • 118 Calories (6%)
  • 7g Total fat (11%)
  • 1g Saturated Fat (4%)
  • 0mg Cholesterol (0%)
  • 565mg Sodium (24%)
  • 11g Carbohydrate (4%)
  • 5g Fiber (19%)
  • 7g Protein (14%)

See the full nutritional analysis from NutritionData.com

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Source: Epicurious

Food News Round-Up: Buzz Kill

By Michael Y. Park No, You’re Not Experiencing Beer Goggles: A web artist turns his the labels on his favorite beers into motion pictures. My favorites: Bitter American, Little Sumpin’ Sumpin, and the Edmund Fitzgerald. What are yours? Man, I’d Kill (Myself) for a Cup of Coffee: That cuppajoe may save your life. A Harvard study finds that people who drink two to four cups of coffee a day have about half the suicide risk of those who drink decaffeinated or no coffee. But don’t go downing the espressos because you’re feeling a little blue–researchers believe most adults naturally drink the correct amount of caffeine each day to maximize the benefits they’d receive. McManna From Heaven: The New York Post poses the question: Is the McDonald’s McDouble great food, or the greatest food? Turning Lemons Into Lemonade: Autistic kid opens lemonade stand. Neighbor calls cops on autistic kid. Local restaurant lets kid open up lemonade stand inside for its customers, with proceeds going to a children’s hospital. Which begs the question: How much are kids in Ontario charging for lemonade, exactly? (I paid 50 cents in Brooklyn recently, and also got a bag of chips for an extra quarter.) Hipster Junk Food: Bushwick restaurant features entrees such as Dorito kimchi carbonara and Spam fried rice. Man, hipsters had to go and ruin Doritos and Spam too? More motion-picture beer labels after the jump …

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Source: Epicurious

Quinoa Evolution

By Regina Schrambling I lived through the whole era of oat bran in everything from potato chips to beer. So I guess I should not be surprised to see the latest super-food popping up in odd places. And that would be quinoa, the grain of the moment. The other day we spotted it on the label of a bar of chocolate and had to try it, only to learn it added nothing of interest, not even a Rice Krispies-like crunch. For the price, we could have had two healthful Lindt bars with sea salt. The second sighting/tasting was actually quite good. An editor took me to lunch last week and, being a powerful regular, was comped a side order of quinoa hush puppies by the chef. The grain was a slightly nubblier alternative to the usual cornmeal. I’m always a sucker for lowercase hush puppies, so I do approve the concept. But there was something amusing about a deep-fried health food designed to be dunked in spicy mayonnaise. Then again, the menu also had a “French fry salad.” Salty potatoes always make the best greens.

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Source: Epicurious

Grilled Oysters

By Sara Bonisteel When an oyster meets the flame, delicious things can happen. At a rooftop barbecue over the weekend, we grilled some oysters (and clams too). It’s a cooking method that just might be that much easier than shucking them to slurp raw. All you have to do is throw them on the grates and wait a four or five minutes until the shells open. You have a steamed shellfish that still has enough of the salty brine to satisfy. Ours were served alongside garlic butter and mignonette sauce. We have a handful of grilled oyster recipes on the site, including Grilled East Coast Oysters with Corn Jalapeno Salsita and Bobby Flay’s Grilled Oysters with Mango Pico de Gallo and Red Chile Horseradish. And, alright, I confess that the photo above is actually a charbroiled oyster from Drago’s in Metairie, La., but you get the idea. (Photo: Sara Bonisteel)

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Source: Epicurious

Doable Challenge: Cut the Salt in Your Condiments

By Megan O. Steintrager In the weeks since we started July’s Doable Challenge: Slash the Sodium, I’ve challenged you to use herbs and spices and citrus and vinegars in place of extra salt and also invited you to join me in choosing lower- sodium canned goods. Now I want to talk about condiments, which can be a sneaky source of excess sodium in one’s diet. Luckily, there are many ways to reduce the salt in your favorite condiments. Here are a few, below, to help you join me in choosing a condiment or two to de-salt this week. Mayonnaise: Since store-bought mayo tends to be high in sodium, Jessica Goldman Foung, creator of Sodium Girl and author of Sodium Girl’s Limitless Low-Sodium Cookbook: How to Lose the Salt and Eat the Foods You Love, says she often substitutes tangy Greek-style yogurt. You can also make own mayo, which allows you to control the added salt. Or use a creamy spread that’s naturally low in sodium, such as hummus or other bean spreads (made with low-sodium canned beans or ones you cooked yourself), Carrot and Yogurt Sauce, or some mashed avocado. Ketchup: As Foung notes in her cookbook, there’s not much more to ketchup than tomatoes, vinegar, sugar, and pepper, so there’s no reason it has to be loaded with sodium, as many store-bought ketchups are. Try Epi’s Homemade Ketchup recipe, using low-sodium canned tomatoes and tomato paste, and you’re in business. Mustard: The good news with mustard is that you can make it yourself in about two seconds with zero salt, simply by mixing mustard powder, such as Colman’s, with water. With just a bit more effort, you can make Homemade Mustard or Hirsheimer’s Hot and Sweet Mustard (pictured). Hot Sauce and Salsa: While store-bought versions of both of these condiments tend to be high in sodium, they actually require very little salt when you make your own. So search Epi’s database for salsa recipes and simply omit or cut down on the added salt, or use chopped chiles and a bit of vinegar or citrus in place of hot sauce. Soy Sauce: The first step here is to replace regular soy sauce with a reduced-sodium version. But since even reduced-sodium soy sauce is high in sodium, Foung recommends replicating the umami flavor that soy sauce provides with other umami-rich ingredients, such as mushrooms and garlic. Appearance and mouthfeel also come into play in dishes like her Tamarind Teriyaki Chicken Skewers in which the color and viscosity of soy-based teriyaki sauce are mimicked with a sauce that includes tamarind paste, brown sugar, molasses, and rice vinegar.

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Source: Epicurious

Grilled Romesco-Style Pork

By Monica Reinagel

brought to you by epicurious.com and NutritionData.com

Calories 445; Total Fat 27g; Carbohydrates 13g

Roasted red peppers and baby spinach are dressed with a hot, slightly spicy dressing and topped with toasted almonds and garlic for a delicious—and extremely nutritious—way to dress up a simple grilled pork tenderloin. Red peppers and spinach contribute antioxidants, almonds are an excellent source of calcium, and studies suggest that garlic helps lower LDL (bad) cholesterol levels. Have some lemon-ginger frozen yogurt for dessert.

Go to the healthy recipe on epicurious.com

Nutritional Information

Amounts per serving plus the % Daily Value (DV) based on a 2,000 calorie diet:

  • 445 Calories (22%)
  • 27g Total fat (42%)
  • 4g Saturated Fat (21%)
  • 109mg Cholesterol (36%)
  • 941mg Sodium (39%)
  • 13g Carbohydrate (4%)
  • 5g Fiber (18%)
  • 39g Protein (78%)

See the full nutritional analysis from NutritionData.com

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Source: Epicurious

Chilled Red Bell Pepper and Habanero Soup

By Monica Reinagel

brought to you by epicurious.com and NutritionData.com

Calories 211; Total Fat 15g; Carbohydrates 18g

This low-calorie, spicy chilled soup will have you craving seconds—and since it has only 211 calories per serving, feel free to indulge. Chili peppers, such as the habañeros in this soup, have a strongly anti-inflammatory compound known as capsaicin, which has been found to help with blood coagulation and may reduce arthritis pain and psoriasis symptoms. A side note to the daring: The hotter the chili pepper, the more capsaicin it contains, and habeñeros pack a wallop. Pair with grilled chicken or fish, and have some soothing Strawberry Buttermilk Ice for dessert.

Go to the healthy recipe on epicurious.com

Photograph By: Romulo Yanes

Nutritional Information

Amounts per serving plus the % Daily Value (DV) based on a 2,000 calorie diet:

  • 211 Calories (11%)
  • 15g Total fat (23%)
  • 2g Saturated Fat (10%)
  • 0mg Cholesterol (0%)
  • 523mg Sodium (22%)
  • 18g Carbohydrate (6%)
  • 4g Fiber (18%)
  • 5g Protein (10%)

See the full nutritional analysis from NutritionData.com

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Source: Epicurious

NFL Star Loves to Bake, Help Others

By Joanne Camas A six-foot-six, 275-pound guy baking dainty cupcakes is an incongruous picture, but many things Israel Idonije does break the mold. Idonije, an NFL veteran, who was born in Nigeria and raised in Canada, was recently honored at the White House for his humanitarian work. His foundation works with kids in his hometown of Winnipeg, Chicago, and West Africa, and he’s a visible presence at his all-star camps for inner-city youth. Defensive lineman Odonije has played for the Chicago Bears for 10 years and took the field in the Super Bowl with the team, but has just signed a one-year contract with the Detroit Lions. While his foundation will remain headquartered in the Windy City, you can imagine Izzy, as he’s known to kids and friends alike, will find time to brighten lives in the troubled Motor City too. The Detroit Lions start training camp for the upcoming season tomorrow, but Odonije managed to find time to answer some questions for Epicurious by email. I know food’s always been a big part of your life – for example, you helped your parents collect food for needy families when you were a child. Does it surprise you that so many families in this country are “food insecure”? It doesn’t surprise me about the amount of hungry children and families in the U.S. It is a sad and unnecessary situation — there is so much wasted surplus. It would be wonderful if there were a system in place to get the surplus food to people in need. Your foundation does a lot of great work with kids. Do you include healthy eating programs? The Israel Idonije Foundation focuses on five keys to life success. One of those keys is self-awareness. Who are you? Who do you want to be? Through self awareness we have the opportunity to discuss living a healthy lifestyle and the role that healthy eating plays. I hear that you love to make cupcakes. Why’s that a favorite thing, and how did it start? I love banana bread. So I make banana bread cupcakes with a blueberry cream cheese icing. It started with watching and helping my mother bake — pies, bread, cookies…you name it. Do you eat them all (hey, you’re an athlete, you need energy!)? Or do you take them to share with your teammates? I eat half and take half to the office or give them away. And do your teammates think it’s ironic that such an athletic man bakes? LOL. I think a lot of the guys cook. What’s your favorite recipe? Two favorites that I love to eat but do not cook are pounded yam and Ogbono soup, both of which are Nigerian recipes. I also love a glass of Chapman — another Nigerian favorite!! Do you cook any other specialties or family favorites? With my eyes closed, I make a great cedar plank salmon with miso glaze, shepherd’s pie, and turkey lasagna. What do you like to eat before a big game? I eat…<div …read more

Source: Epicurious

A Cherry Recipe Jubilee

By Tanya Steel Life is very much a bowl of cherries–well, actually many bowls of cherries, if you live in Northern Michigan, the self-proclaimed Tart Cherry Capital of the World. I just spent a long weekend there (above, my shot of the Leland Harbor), and it was a veritable cherries jubilee, from cherry compote to cherry fudge to cherry ice cream to the traditional cherry pie. There were cherry-shaped Petoskey stone necklaces, potholders, dish towels, cutting boards, and muffin tins. Traverse City even has an annual cherry festival in July, attended by thousands. And, with claims that tart cherries help reduce inflammation due to the antioxidant anthocyanin, I felt it was my duty to throw fresh cherries into every dish I ate for four days. Here are the best cherry recipes we tried, broken down by course: Breakfast Cherry-Apricot Yogurt Sundaes Quick Chunky Plum and Cherry Jam Lunch Arugula, Golden Cherries, Marcona Almonds and Parmigiano-Reggiano Cherry Chipotle Chili Dinner Butter Lettuce, Chicken, and Cherry Salad Grilled Pork Chops with Cherry Relish Classic Sour Cherry Pie with Lattice Crust PS: If you want to bake a cherry pie, but are a novice or nervous baker, check out our pie videos, which show you how to make pie dough by hand, or dough in a food processor, how to roll out and transfer the dough, make a top crust, blind bake a crust, or make a lattice top crust.

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Source: Epicurious