Tag Archives: health

Three Simple Steps: How to Start Saving for Retirement

By Chuck Saletta

road signpost pointing to work and retire with person walking down the road

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Saving for your retirement is a big deal. Barring the income you might get from pensions (not what they once were) and Social Security (not likely to stay what it once was) all you’ll have is the money you save to last you the rest of your life. And it’s no secret that if your accounts run dry, it’s incredibly difficult for a retiree to rejoin the workforce a decade or more after leaving it.

Given all that, it’s understandable if you’re a bit worried about coming up with enough money that you’ll be able to retire comfortably on your terms. While building and maintaining that nest egg is a long-term commitment, it’s important to remember that you have the rest of your career to get there. With a solid plan and the flexibility to handle life’s curve balls, you can greatly improve your chances of retiring with a portfolio that can last as long as you do.

3 Steps to Get From Here to Retired

The toughest part of investing for retirement is that you face so many unknowns. How long will you live? What will the market do? Will your Social Security benefits get cut? How tame (or wild) will inflation be? Will your mental and physical health hold out, or will you need the help of a caregiver?

Those are all wise questions to ask, but unfortunately, they can’t be answered with any certainty until it’s too late to do anything about it. The best any of us can really do is develop a reasonable plan based on decent assumptions, and then adjust as life happens. With that in mind, here is a three-step foundation for a solid plan:

1. Set a target. What sort of lifestyle do you want in your retirement? Are you the kind of person who’d be happy rocking away on the stoop, watching the world go by? Or do you picture a retirement filled with world travel, box seats at the symphony, and generous philanthropic gifts to your favorite charities?

Whatever your plans, start by estimating your anticipated monthly expenses. Subtract from that your anticipated net Social Security check and any monthly pension payments you may get, then multiply the remainder by 300. That’s about how large your total portfolio will need to be to cover your costs. At that size, your portfolio should generate enough growth and income that you can take advantage of the 4 percent rule, a solid (if rough) estimate that will help reduce the odds that you’ll outlive your money.

2. Take what help you can get, and ramp up when you can. While that 300-times-monthly-expenses estimate may seem daunting, there are a number programs available to help you build your nest egg faster. Qualified retirement accounts like IRAs, 401(k)s, 403(b)s, and the government’s Thrift Savings …read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at DailyFinance

'Powerful effect of exercise' against Alzheimer's

Exercising for 150 minutes each week may be the best treatment for Alzheimer’s, according to a study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. Researchers from the University of Maryland School of Public Health conducted the study, which reveals that exercise could improve cognitive function in people at risk of Alzheimer’s by improving the efficiency of brain activity… …read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at Medical News Today

BPA may be linked to infertility in women

A new study from Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) recently analyzed the effects of Bisphenol-A (BPA) on human eggs, and it may reveal why some couples are unable to conceive. The study, published recently online in the journal Human Reproduction, is the first of its kind to show the direct effects of BPA on egg maturation in humans… …read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at Medical News Today

Peripheral artery disease: dramatically higher rates worldwide

The number of people with peripheral artery disease (PAD) is on the rise, according to a study published in The Lancet. PAD refers to diseases of the blood vessels outside of the heart and brain. Peripheral artery disease causes the blood vessels to narrow, restricting blood flow in the arms, legs, stomach and kidneys… …read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at Medical News Today

White House Graph Doesn't Prove Anything About Obamacare And Part-Time Jobs

By Robert Book

For several months, there have been reports of companies, often in the restaurant industry, reducing worker hours to avoid the Obamacare employer mandate penalties. The employer mandate applies only to “full-time” workers, and full-time is defined as working 30 or more hours per week; this potentially gives many employers the opportunity to avoid or reduce the penalty by converting as many workers as possible from full-time to part-time by limiting their work schedule to less than 30 hours a week. …read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at Forbes Health

Are Aging Parents In La-La Land About Their Health?

By Carolyn Rosenblatt, Contributor

The United States of Aging Survey, conducted by the National Council on Aging (NCOA), UnitedHealthcare and USA TODAY reports on seniors’ perspectives on aging and what concerns them. Of interest is what doesn’t seem to concern them so much:  taking care of their health. …read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at Forbes Latest

Leadership Lessons From A Baby Food Disruptor

By Susan Adams, Forbes Staff

Neil Grimmer is changing the way babies and toddlers eat. A former sculpture student and conceptual artist who worked at product design firm IDEO and then at healthy snack maker Clif Bar & Co., he started his company, Plum Inc., in 2007. Grimmer’s inspiration: his daughter Paxton’s resistance to the organic baked squash he and his wife Tana used to pack into Paxton’s lunch box. To make the food more kid-friendly, Grimmer pureed it and designed a container now ubiquitous among health-conscious families: a spouted pouch made out of malleable plastic and thin aluminum that a baby as young as eight months old can hold in her hand and suck. …read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at Forbes Latest

Press Briefing by Press Secretary Jay Carney, 7/31/2013

By The White House

James S. Brady Press Briefing Room

1:04 P.M. EDT

MR. CARNEY: I know you all welcomed her back on Monday when I wasn’t here, but it is great to have Jamie Smith back, a new mom, and a new, proud mom at that. If you haven't seen her little girl, she is beautiful, truly beautiful. So it’s great to have Jamie back. And it’s great to be here. (Laughter.) Now she’s going to have to go straight to daycare and check in on her. (Laughter.) I remember how that felt.

It’s great to be back here with you today. I have, before I take your questions, just a couple of things I want to note for you.

First, on Tuesday, August 6th, the President will travel to the Phoenix, Arizona area, to continue talking with Americans about his better bargain for the middle class. On Tuesday in Tennessee, the President laid out one cornerstone of that vision, a plan to create good jobs that pay decent wages by investing in manufacturing and infrastructure. Next week in Arizona, the President will lay out his plan to continue to help responsible homeowners and those Americans who seek to own their own homes as another cornerstone of how we can strengthen the middle class in America.

That afternoon, the President will then travel to Burbank, California, to tape an appearance on the Tonight Show with Jay Leno. The following day, Wednesday, August 7th — there’s a Leno fan in the front row I can tell. (Laughter.) The following day, on Wednesday, August 7th, the President will travel to Camp Pendleton to visit with troops and their families and to thank them for their extraordinary service to our nation.

My next announcement is in here somewhere — I thought. So with that — it’s not a big one — (laughter) — it’s just a meeting I'm sure you’d be interested in. No, I just wanted to note — and I will as much as I can off the cuff that today is the 49th anniversary of Medicare, and millions and millions of Americans — senior citizens — have led richer and healthier lives because of this extraordinary program and its success.

The President has, through a number of actions, and most noticeably, through the Affordable Care Act, strengthened Medicare and provided more benefits to seniors. And we are seeing a reduction in the growth rate of costs in Medicare, historic change in that growth rate, and we've seen it, obviously, in the private sector health care market as well. And that is a direct benefit of the Affordable Care Act as we implement it. And so that is a welcome thing.

We have over the years experienced debates about Medicare, calls to see it wither on the vine by some, efforts to turn it into a voucher program, essentially efforts to disrupt, dismantle and, in some ways, ultimately defeat Medicare. …read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at The White House Press Office

The Canary In The Coal Mine

By John Osborn, Contributor

The Obama administration’s decision to delay for one year the implementation of the mandatory insurance coverage provision for employers with more than 50 employees has given critics and pundits ample ammunition to levy charges of political capitulation and administrative incompetence.  It may well evidence of either or both.  More than that, it’s the proverbial canary in the coal mine as it sounds an early warning sign that employers of all shapes and sizes may eventually abandon the antiquated practice of linking health insurance coverage to the workplace – and government coercion will do little to stop it. …read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at Forbes Latest