Tag Archives: Arlington National Cemetery

Medal of Honor soldier killed in Korean War to receive hero's burial

By Joshua Rhett Miller

The remains of a soldier awarded the Medal of Honor after being killed in the Korean War will be returned to his relatives for burial with full military honors more than 62 years after his death, officials announced Wednesday.

Army Lt. Col. Don C. Faith Jr., of Washington, Ind., will be buried April 17 in Arlington National Cemetery, officials from the Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office said.

Faith, a veteran of World War II who continued to serve in the Army during the Korean War, was seriously injured by shrapnel on Dec. 1, 1950, and died a day later from those injuries. But his body was not recovered by U.S. forces at the time.

He was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor, the United States‘ highest military honor recognizing personal acts of exceptional valor during battle.

“What’s so amazing is that our country doesn’t give up,” Barbara “Bobbie” Broyles, Faith’s only child, told FoxNews.com on Wednesday. “They keep looking for the missing and the prisoners of war and people who are unaccounted for in battles.”

Broyles, her husband and the couple’s three children will travel to Washington next week for her father’s burial. And with the current political climate in North Korea, she said it’s “particularly important” to remember veterans of the Korean War.

“It’s now just becoming apparent how critical the Battle of Chosin was,” Broyles told FoxNews.com in reference to conflict along the eastern side of the Chosin Reservoir from Nov. 27 to Dec. 1, 1950.”We sacrificed a lot to help Korea.”

At the time of his death, Faith and his unit — 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment — were attached to the 31st Regimental Combat Team as it advanced along the eastern side of the Chosin Reservoir in North Korea.

During attacks by the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces, Faith assumed command with his supervisor missing, and he continuously rallied his troops, personally leading an assault on an enemy position, defense officials said.

In 2004, a joint team from the U.S. and North Korea surveyed the area where Faith was last seen and located his remains. To confirm the find, scientists used circumstantial evidence, forensic identification tools and mitochondrial DNA, using samples from Faith’s brother for comparison.

“I’m incredulous,” Broyles, a 66-year-old psychotherapist, said when reached at her home in Baton Rouge, La. She praised Department of Defense scientists and researchers for their relentless work. “He’s been missing for 62 years and it’s a wonderful, wonderful thing that he’s been found.”

More than 7,900 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War, U.S. defense officials said.

From: http://feeds.foxnews.com/~r/foxnews/national/~3/S3h0ND0FtCg/

Ex-CIA chief aided WWII hero's Arlington burial

A request by a Swiss-born World War II hero spy to be buried at Arlington National Cemetery received a boost from CIA Director David Petraeus (peh-TRAY‘-uhs) months before he resigned amid a sex scandal.

A Petraeus letter to Army officials, provided to The Associated Press, reveals that the retired four-star general took an interest in the case of Dr. Rene Joyeuse (rehn-AY‘ zhoy-ERHZ’), a retired doctor from upstate New York who died in June.

Joyeuse’s Arlington burial was initially rejected because he wasn’t a member of the U.S. military. The family received support from U.S. military and intelligence officials, and the decision was reversed on the same November day that Petraeus resigned.

Joyeuse’s memorial service at Arlington is scheduled for Friday afternoon.

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Source: FULL ARTICLE at Fox US News

Families remember 5 US soldiers killed in Afghanistan helicopter crash

When Capt. Sara Knutson graduated from West Point, she made it clear to her mother that she didn’t join the Army to sit behind a desk.

“She came home and said ‘Uhhh, I’m going to fly helicopters or be an MP,'” Lynn Knutson said Sunday. “I was kind of like ‘Oh, couldn’t you do something safer?’ And she said ‘Mom, I’m in the Army, everything is dangerous.'”

Sara Knutson, 27, of Eldersburg, Md., was among five crew members killed when their UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter crashed March 11 in Kandahar, Afghanistan. The military released their names late Saturday.

The crash is under investigation. Army officials have said that the crew was on a training mission using night vision goggles, and that no enemy attacks were reported.

All five soldiers were assigned to Hunter Army Airfield near Savannah, Ga.

Lynn Knutson said she received an email from her daughter, a Black Hawk pilot, the night she died: “Got to go mom, got to go fly,” the email said.

Knutson said she hasn’t been told whether her daughter was piloting when the helicopter crashed. She had previously been deployed to Pakistan on a humanitarian mission, flying helicopters to help flood victims.

The 2007 West Point graduate was fun-loving and very smart. She liked to camp and snowboard in Alaska, and she enjoyed judo, singing, and putting on heels and dancing, her mother said.

“She had one of those laughs, if you heard her laugh once and you heard it again, you would know it was her,” Knutson said. “It was one of those infectious kinds of laughs.”

Spc. Zachary L. Shannon, 21, volunteered for a deployment to Afghanistan and had no qualms about doing so, even if it ultimately meant giving his life.

“Zach said, ‘I’d do it. For me to go over, that means another service member can come home to their family,'” his mother, Kim Allison, said Sunday. “It blew me away that someone so young could think so unselfishly.”

Shannon loved fishing and his Tampa Bay-area sports teams, and he planned on a military career. He was in ROTC in high school, and he always wanted to fly Black Hawk helicopters, his parents said Sunday.

Shannon knew the risks of serving in Afghanistan and while he was home before his deployment, he talked with his mother about his last wishes. He wanted to be buried in Dunedin instead of Arlington National Cemetery, and so the family has a memorial planned next week at a local VFW post.

The oldest of the crew, 31-year-old Staff Sgt. Marc A. Scialdo, of Naples, Fla. was a Black Hawk section chief. He joined the Army in January 2003 and arrived at the unit in January 2012. His mother, Susan Scialdo, previously told The Associated Press that the soldier made his family so proud he was nicknamed “the Golden Boy.”

“He made our family shine,” the 31-year-old soldier’s mother, Susan Scialdo, said Friday. “He lifted us all. He was just an awesome individual. Always helpful, always shining.”

Chief Warrant Officer Bryan J. Henderson of Franklin, La., was also among …read more
Source: FULL ARTICLE at Fox US News

What’s On Your Mind • USS Monitor Interment – Arlington National Cemetery

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By Gary Triplett

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USS Monitor Interment – Arlington National Cemetery
The Navy announced Feb. 21, 2013 that the March 8, 2013 graveside interment ceremony of the remains of two unknown Sailors recovered from the USS Monitor shipwreck will be open to the public. 

The unknown Sailors were lost along with 14 of their shipmates when Monitor sank off Cape Hatteras, N.C. on Dec. 31, 1862. 

All 16 Sailors will be memorialized on a group marker in section 46 of the cemetery, which is between the amphitheater and the USS Maine Mast memorial. 

The specific date of the interment was chosen to recognize the Monitor’s role in the Battle of Hampton Roads 151 years ago. It is Navy custom and tradition to honor the service member’s final resting place by conducting an official burial ceremony.
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Statistics: Posted by Gary Triplett — Sun Mar 10, 2013 4:45 pm


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Source: FULL ARTICLE at gov.summit.net

2 Civil War sailors from USS Monitor buried

A century and a half after the Civil War ship the USS Monitor sank, two unknown crewmen found in the ironclad’s turret have been buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

Friday’s burial may be the last time Civil War soldiers are buried at the cemetery.

The Monitor made history when the Union ship fought the Confederate CSS Virginia in the first battle between two ironclads on March 9, 1862. The battle was a draw.

The Monitor sank about nine months later off North Carolina. Sixteen sailors died.

In 2002, the ship’s turret was raised from the ocean floor. The skeletons of the two crew members were found inside. Researchers tried to identify the men using DNA and other methods but were only able to narrow down the possibilities to six people.

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Source: FULL ARTICLE at Fox US News

USS Monitor Civil War sailors to be buried at Arlington National Cemetery 150 years later

Two unknown crewmen found in the USS Monitor’s turret will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery 150 years after the Civil War sank off the North Carolina coast.

Navy Secretary Ray Mabus is scheduled to speak during Friday’s ceremony, which will include Monitor kin who believe the two Union sailors are their ancestors.

Sixteen sailors died when the Monitor went down in rough seas off Cape Hatteras on March 9, 1862. The two crew members’ skeletons and the remains of their uniforms were found in 2002 when the ship’s rusted turret was raised from the ocean floor.

The Monitor made nautical history when it fought in the first battle between two ironclads. The battle with the CSS Virginia was a draw.

“These may very well be the last Navy personnel from the Civil War to be buried at Arlington,” Mabus said in a statement earlier this week. “It’s important we honor these brave men and all they represent as we reflect upon the significant role Monitor and her crew had in setting the course of our modern Navy.”

Although testing has narrowed the identities of the men down to six, descendants of all 16 soldiers who died when the ship sank are expected at the ceremony.

Diana Rambo, of Fresno, Calif., said DNA testing showed a 50 percent chance that one man was Jacob Nicklis, her grandfather’s uncle. A ring on his right finger matched one in an old photograph, adding to the likelihood he was her relative. She had planned to be Friday’s ceremony, she said.

“It’s been interesting to be connected to something so momentous, and we’re looking forward to the ceremony,” Rambo told FoxNews.com.

She said the development has brought several branches of the family together as they sift through old letters and photos and piece together their shared genealogy. One letter in particular made her long-lost relative seem real.

“I’ve started doing the research, and even read letters he wrote to his father saying he really didn’t want to go,” said Rambo, who was able to tell her 90-year-old mother of the Navy’s revelation a week before her death. “And you think about how many of these kids today are in that situation.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Source: FULL ARTICLE at Fox US News

Civil War Sailors to Get Arlington Burial, 150 Years On

By Rob Quinn A pair of Union sailors who perished on the battleship USS Monitor 150 years ago will receive heroes’ burials at Arlington National Cemetery later this week, Fox reports. The burial will take place on the 151st anniversary of the Battle of Hampton Roads, in which the Monitor fought the Confederate… …read more
Source: FULL ARTICLE at Newser – Great Finds

150 years later, Union sailors from USS Monitor to be buried at Arlington

By Greg Wilson

Two Navy sailors slated for heroes’ burials at Arlington National Cemetery have waited a century and a half for the honor.

The men were among the crew members who perished aboard the legendary Union battleship the USS Monitor, which fought an epic Civil War battle with Confederate vessel The Merrimack in the first battle between two ironclad ships in the Battle of Hampton Roads, on March 9, 1862.

Nine months later, the Monitor sank in rough seas off of Cape Hatteras, where it was discovered in 1973. Two skeletons and the tattered remains of their uniforms were discovered in the rusted hulk of the Union ironclad in 2002, when its 150-ton turret was brought to the surface. The Navy spent most of a decade trying to determine the identity of the remains through DNA testing.

“These may very well be the last Navy personnel from the Civil War to be buried at Arlington,” Navy Secretary Ray Mabus said. “It’s important we honor these brave men and all they represent as we reflect upon the significant role Monitor and her crew had in setting the course of our modern Navy.”

Although testing has narrowed the identities of the men down to six, descendants of all 16 soldiers who died when the ship sank are expected at the ceremony. Diana Rambo, of Fresno, Calif., said DNA testing showed a 50 percent chance that one man was Jacob Nicklis, her grandfather’s uncle. A ring on his right finger matched one in an old photograph, adding to the likelihood he was her relative. She plans to be at the cemetery when he is buried.

“It’s been interesting to be connected to something so momentous, and we’re looking forward to the ceremony,” Rambo told FoxNews.com.

She said the development has brought several branches of the family together as they sift through old letters and photos and piece together their shared genealogy. One letter in particular made her long-lost relative seem real.

“I’ve started doing the research, and even read letters he wrote to his father saying he really didn’t want to go,” said Rambo, who was able to tell her 90-year-old mother of the Navy’s revelation a week before her death. “And you think about how many of these kids today are in that situation.”

David Alberg, superintendent of the Monitor sanctuary, pressed for the pair to have Arlington burial honors, as did the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Maritime Heritage Program and descendants of the surviving Monitor crewmembers.

Although most schoolkids learn that the Monitor fought the Merrimack to a draw in 1862, the ship that the Monitor took on was actually dubbed the Virginia, and built on the hull of the U.S. Navy frigate USS Merrimack. Some 16 sailors died when the Monitor sank, while about 50 more crewmembers were plucked from the sea by the crew of the Rhode Island.

Although the Monitor sank soon after the battle, it still outlasted the Virginia, which the Confederates were forced to scuttle in early May. The Monitor sailed up the James …read more
Source: FULL ARTICLE at Fox US News

West Virginia city to honor veteran hiking across US

Morgantown is publicly recognizing a retired Marine from Pennsylvania who’s hiking across America to honor service members and veterans.

City officials will issue a proclamation to Lance Robinson at 2 p.m. Monday outside the Public Safety Building.

The Vietnam veteran is trying to build support for Brother to Brother Day, a nationwide day of remembrance and respect.

He started his effort in 2010, pulling a flag-covered cart 300 miles from his home near Pittsburgh to the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia. He restarted his hike later that year.

West Virginia is the 27th state he’s visited out of 35.

Robinson estimates it will take him about a month to walk through West Virginia. He’s planning stops at VA hospitals and memorials.

…read more
Source: FULL ARTICLE at Fox US News

Ceremony for Monitor sailors stirs familial ties

By Jonathan_So

A century and a half after USS Monitor sank, the interment of two unknown crewmen found in the Civil War ironclad’s turret is bringing together people from across the country with distant but powerful ties to those who died aboard.

The ceremony Friday at Arlington National Cemetery in Washington will include Monitor kin who believe the two sailors — whose remains were discovered in 2002 — are their ancestors, despite DNA testing that has failed to make a conclusive link. But the families stress that the interment pays homage to all 16 Union sailors who died when the ship went down, and nearly 100 people from Maine to California are expected to attend.

“When I learned they were going to do a memorial and have the burial at Arlington, it was like, ‘I can’t miss that,'” said Andy Bryan of Holden, Maine, who will travel with his daughter Margaret to the capital. He said DNA testing found a 50 percent likelihood that Monitor crewman William Bryan, his great-great-great-uncle, was one of the two found in the summer of 2002, when the 150-ton turret was raised from the ocean floor off Cape Hatteras, N.C.

“If it’s not William Bryan, I’m OK with that,” Bryan said. “This is a once-in-a-lifetime thing, and I feel like I should be there.”…

Source:
AP

Source URL:
http://bigstory.ap.org/article/ceremony-monitor-sailors-stirs-familial-ties

Date:
3-2-13

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Source: FULL ARTICLE at History News Network – George Mason University

Iwo Jima original sculpture for sale

By hnn

It’s the original Iwo Jima monument. It was inspired by combat photographer Joe Rosenthal‘s picture of five marines and a sailor raising the American flag during a battle that cost 6,000 U.S. lives.
Sculptor Felix de Weldon was so moved he used his own money to create it, finishing the 12-foot statue six months after the battle.
The monument was displayed in front of the Federal Reserve building in Washington during the late 40’s. But then the government asked de Weldon to build a 32-foot-tall version — the Marine Corps War Memorial — which sits just outside of Arlington National Cemetery.
The smaller one was forgotten ….
Source:
CBS News

Source URL:
http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-18563_162-57570176/collector-unearths-iconic-ww-ii-sculpture/

Date:
2-19-13

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Source: FULL ARTICLE at History News Network – George Mason University

2 unknown sailors from Civil War ironclad USS Monitor to be interred at Arlington

By hnn

RICHMOND, Va. — The remains of two unknown Union sailors recovered from the Civil War ironclad USS Monitor will be interred in Arlington National Cemetery on March 8, Navy Secretary Ray Mabus said Tuesday.

“These may very well be the last Navy personnel from the Civil War to be buried at Arlington,” Mabus said in a statement. “It’s important we honor these brave men and all they represent as we reflect upon the significant role Monitor and her crew had in setting the course of our modern Navy.”

The two skeletons and the tattered remains of their uniforms were discovered in the rusted hulk of the Union Civil War ironclad in 2002 when its 150-ton turret was raised from the ocean floor off Cape Hatteras, N.C. Conservators of the wreck had a forensic reconstruction done on the two men’s faces in the longshot bid that someone could identify the sailors who went down with the Monitor 150 years ago….

Source:
AP

Source URL:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/navy-2-unknown-sailors-from-civil-war-ironclad-uss-monitor-to-be-interred-at-arlington/2013/02/13/c8ee0fae-759a-11e2-9889-60bfcbb02149_story.html

Date:
2-13-13

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Source: FULL ARTICLE at History News Network – George Mason University

West Wing Week 01/25/13 or… “Behind the Scenes: Inauguration 2013”

By <a href="/author-detail/44">Adam Garber</a>

This week, Washington D.C. was transformed into an historic stage, with an estimated one million people on hand to witness the President and Vice President take the Oath of Office at the United States Capitol. Through it all, West Wing Week was there, from the terrace of the Capitol to backstage at the balls. America, take a moment to look back at where we've been this week for this special edition of West Wing Week, January 18th to the 24th, or “Behind the Scenes: Inauguration 2013.”

Saturday, January 19th

  • The First Family participated in the National Day of Service, helping out in the construction of some new bookshelves at Burrville Elementary School in Washington DC.
  • The first Lady and Dr. Biden kicked off Inauguration weekend by honoring military families at the, “Our Children, Our Future” kids’ concert.

Sunday, January 20th

  • The Vice President was sworn into office by Justice Sotomayor.
  • The President traveled to Arlington National Cemetery to meet the Vice President for a wreath laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknowns.
  • The President was officially sworn into office by Chief Justice Roberts.

Monday, January 21st

  • The 57th Inaugural Ceremony in our nation’s history occurred on the National Mall, followed by the Inaugural Parade.
  • In the evening, the President attended the Commander-in-Chief’s Ball and the Inaugural Ball, with Jennifer Hudson providing the soundtrack to his dance with the First Lady.

Tuesday, January 22nd

  • The President, Vice President, First Lady, and Dr. Biden attended the 57th National Prayer Service at the National Cathedral.
  • The President and First Lady greeted guests on a White House tour.
  • The President attended the Staff Ball to thank and celebrate with those who worked on his campaign and in his White House administration.

Thursday, January 24th

  • The Vice President hosted a “Fireside Hangout” on Google+ to talk about reducing gun violence.
  • The President introduced his nominee to be the Chair of the Securities and Exchange Commission, Mary Joe White, and announced that he will re-nominate Richard Cordray to direct the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

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Source: FULL ARTICLE at The White House