Tag Archives: Northern Ireland

Under leaden skies: Where heavy metal clouds the stars

(Phys.org) —In a paper shortly to be published in the Oxford University Press journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, a team of astronomers from the Armagh Observatory in Northern Ireland report the discovery of two unusual stars with extremely high concentrations of lead in their atmospheres. …read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at Phys.org

The Story Of The Greatest Game Ever Played In America That You Have Probably Never Heard Of

By Bobby McMahon, Contributor

The first MLS Cup Final in 1996 was a dramatic affair that saw D.C. United recover from a late two-goal deficit against the Los Angeles Galaxy to win through Eddie Pope’s golden goal in overtime. Yet the drama at Foxborough Stadium that day could not come close to emulating the ‘Greatest Soccer Final Played on American Soil’ — the first continental professional final held between franchises from those two cities to crown the 1967 United Soccer Association champion. Nearly 18,000 fans at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum witnessed 11 goals, two hat-tricks, three penalty kicks, last-minute equalizers in normal and extra-time, one sending off, countless punch-ups and a heartbreaking golden own goal in sudden-death overtime.  Ian Thomson is a former Wall Street reporter and freelance soccer journalist based in Morgantown, West Virginia. In his first book “Summer Of ’67” Ian tells the story of that final and the 12 teams that arrived in North America from around the globe to compete in the first United Soccer Association. The twelve teams were adopted by cities across North America and went through name changes. Cagliari of Italy became the Chicago Mustangs, Wolves and Sunderland from England played as the Los Angeles Wolves and the Vancouver Royal Canadians. Stoke City became the Cleveland Stokers, Bangu from Brazil the Houston Stars and Dundee United offered a Texas rivalry as the Dallas Tornado. Toronto City was Hibernian from Scotland, C.A. Cerro of Uruguay the New York Skyliners  and the Netherlands side ADO Den Haag took temporary possession of the mouthful that was the San Francisco Golden Gate Gales. Rounding out the 12 teams was Glentoran of Northern Ireland as the Detroit Cougars, Shamrock Rovers from the Republic not surprisingly lined up as the  Boston Rovers and Aberdeen became the Washington Whips. Ian was kind enough to take time to answer some of my questions. Q What drew you to this specific subject? A I’d heard many years ago that my team, Aberdeen from Scotland, had played as the Washington Whips in some far-flung American tournament before I was born. I never thought too much about it until I attended my first D.C. United game at RFK Stadium last year. Shortly afterward, I interviewed Notre Dame head coach Bobby Clark for a college soccer story. Bobby was Aberdeen’s goalkeeper during the 1967 tour. It struck me that the United Soccer Association was a key milestone in the timeline of U.S. soccer history that remains largely obscure. Q As you did your research what level of awareness did you find 0f the 1967 United Soccer Association on both sides of the Atlantic? Or was it case that Pele signing for the Cosmos years later was the starting point for most?  A It’s funny, I was talking to Vancouver Whitecaps head coach Martin Rennie after his team’s 1-0 win at RFK Stadium in June. Rennie is an Aberdeen fan, yet he had no idea that The Dons had played in that venue. Sunderland’s club historian had written a …read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at Forbes Latest

Masterly Muirfield set to test Open challengers

The Open returns to Muirfield for the 16th time starting Thursday, with two straight weeks of sunshine having turned the famed Scottish links into a firm, fast and furious test for the best.

Drivers will seldom be seen and irons will be the weapon of choice off many tees as an elite field looks to stay out of the punishing rough and create the best angles to attack the pins at the par-71 East Lothian layout.

Graeme McDowell, the 2010 US Open champion who grew up playing on links in Northern Ireland and who will start among the favourites, compared golfing at Muirfield to playing a game of chess.

“This is certainly a game of chess this week, where you have to position your pieces and keep them in play,” he said.

“This golf course is all right there in front of you, there’s no hidden tricks to it. Good quality golf gets rewarded.

“You hit the shots, they’ll be where you expect them to be. It gives you half a chance around the greens. It’s very penal off the tee, about half a chance around the greens, gives you a chance to pitch and hit bunker shots, and doesn’t kind of unduly punish you too much.

“Nine out of ten times this golf course will reward good golf, and punish you off the tee, but give yourself opportunities up and around the greens.

“I think it’s a fair golf course which rewards great players and great golf, probably why we have so many great champions at this venue.”

A quick check down the list of past winners at Muirfield certainly confirms what McDowell says as they include Ernie Els, the last time it was played there in 2002, Nick Faldo in 1992 and 1987, Tom Watson (1980), Lee Trevino (1972), Jack Nicklaus (1966) and Gary Player (1959).

Tournament favourite Tiger Woods is eager to join that list and finally win his 15th major title, over five years after his last, which came at the 2008 US Open at Torrey Pines.

The 37-year-old American knows Muirfield well and not all his memories are fond ones.

The last time it was held there in 2002, he went out in his third round just as a storm system came out of the North Sea, whipping up havoc on the course and condemning the American to a 10-over 81, to date the worst score of his professional career.

That left him with no chance of making it three majors in a row, having already won the Masters and the US Open that year, and Woods has failed to get that far along the road to the Grand Slam since then.

Still, he insists he harbours no hard feelings.

“Look at the list of past champions. The number of Hall of Famers that there are who have won here,” said Woods, who said that the elbow injury that sidelined him after last month’s US Open is no longer a problem.

“I think it just goes to show you you really have to hit the ball well. You have to …read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at Fox World News

Judge in NY clears way for ex-Marine's extradition

A former U.S. Marine charged with killing a couple in the Philippines can face charges there after a federal magistrate in New York ruled Wednesday there was sufficient evidence to extradite him.

Timothy Kaufman, 35, will remain behind bars until U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry makes a decision on surrendering him to Philippine authorities, under the order from Magistrate Randolph Treece.

Kaufman, formerly of Knoxville, Tenn., is one of three men charged by authorities in the Philippines with the 2011 killing of a retired Northern Ireland police officer and his girlfriend. David Balmer, 54, and 26-year-old Elma de Guia were found dead on Sept. 2, 2011, in a bedroom of a home owned by a local club owner who was friends with Balmer.

Kaufman was arrested in April near his grandfather’s upstate New York home. He professed his innocence at a court hearing last month and his lawyer Mark Sacco argued that Philippine authorities failed to establish probable cause.

Treece rejected that argument in the ruling, saying the evidence was “sufficient to sustain the charges” against Kaufman under provisions of the extradition treaty between the United States and the Philippines.

There was no immediate comment from Sacco.

Kaufman left the Philippines a month after the killings. He was arrested in April at a Saratoga Springs-area business, near where he had been staying with his grandfather. Kaufman testified at his hearing that he had had been living in the open before his arrest, working part-time as a bartender and holding a driver’s license.

…read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at Fox US News

Judge clears way for ex-Marine's extradition

A federal judge says there is enough evidence against a former U.S. Marine charged with killing a couple in the Philippines to have him extradited.

Magistrate Randolph Treece ruled Wednesday that the evidence against Timothy Kaufman was sufficient to sustain the charges against him. Treece ordered Kaufman detained until U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry makes a decision on surrendering him to Philippine authorities.

Kaufman is one of three men charged with the 2011 killing of a retired Northern Ireland police officer and his girlfriend. Kaufman has testified that he was not involved in the killing of 54-year-old David Balmer and 26-year-old Elma de Guia in the home of a local club owner.

The 35-year-old Kaufman has been in jail since he was arrested in April in the Albany area.

…read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at Fox US News

MPs pass gay marriage bill

MPs passed a bill legalising same-sex marriage in England and Wales, paving the way for the first gay weddings in 2014.

The House of Commons decided not to oppose a number of minor amendments to the Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill proposed by the House of Lords.

The legislation is now expected to receive official assent from Queen Elizabeth later this week after MPs agreed to changes such as ensuring protections for transgender couples.

Already on Monday night, jubilant gay rights activists danced outside parliament as the government-backed bill passed unopposed through the House of Lords. Some members there wore pink carnations.

A spokesman for the Department of Culture, Media and Sport, which is overseeing the new law, told AFP the bill would probably receive royal assent on Wednesday or Thursday.

“But we are looking at seeing the first gay weddings in the middle of 2014 because there are various issues to sort out, such as its impact on pensions,” the spokesman added.

Government computer systems also need to be updated to allow same-sex marriages to be registered, at an estimated cost of ??2 million.

But the government hopes legalising gay marriage will bring an overall boost to the economy, estimating that the change could bring in up to ??14.4 million a year for caterers, hotels and the rest of the wedding industry.

The bill survived a stormy passage through parliament, with dozens of Tories voting against it.

Tory minister Gerald Howarth criticised the way the government had backed the bill.

“I have to say that it is astonishing that a bill for which there is absolutely no mandate, against which a majority of Conservatives voted against, has been bulldozed through both Houses and just two hours of debate tonight is an absolute parliamentary disgrace,” he said.

“I think the government should think very carefully in future if they want the support of these benches. Offending large swathes of the Conservative Party is not a good way of going about it.”

An attempt in the Lords last month to kill off the legislation with a “wrecking amendment” failed.

Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg said the new law would ensure that gay couples felt “recognised and valued, not excluded”.

Gay rights activists have vowed to press on for equal marriage in Scotland and Northern Ireland.

But opponents of gay marriage have warned that the legislation will “come back to bite” Prime Minister David Cameron.

The Coalition for Marriage campaign group said it would mobilise a 700,000-strong support base ahead of next year’s European elections and the general election in 2015.

“They are passionate, motivated and determined to fight on against a law that renders terms like ‘husband and wife’ meaningless,” said the group’s chairman Colin Hart.

Civil partnerships for gay couples have been legal in Britain since 2005, giving them identical rights and responsibilities to straight couples in a civil marriage.

But campaigners point to differences, such as gay couples’ inability to choose a religious ceremony or to call their partnership a “marriage”.

The new law will ban the Churches of England and Wales — which are …read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at Fox World News

Fifth night of violence roils Belfast

Police were attacked with petrol bombs and a French press photographer assaulted during a fifth night of violence on the streets of east Belfast, police said.

Clashes broke out as large crowds gathered on the city’s on the Lower Newtownards Road, the Northern Ireland Police Service (PSNI) said.

A police vehicle was struck by two petrol bombs and a number of other missiles, but there were no reports of any injuries, police said.

The French photographer who was assaulted also had his camera stolen.

Four cars were hijacked and set on fire and in the latest wave of unrest.

Trouble also flared in the Mount Vernon area of north Belfast and in the Woodvale Road and North Queen Street areas.

The clashes began on Friday after police tried to enforce a decision banning the Orange Order from marching through a Catholic republican area of the Northern Ireland capital.

About a thousand police officers from mainland Britain had been sent to Northern Ireland in anticipation of tensions over the traditional Twelfth of July parades.

That event is the climax of the Protestant Orange Order’s marching season.

The July 12 parade marks the victory of Protestant king William III of Orange over the deposed Catholic king James II at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690.

It is a flashpoint for tensions between the Protestant and Catholic communities in the province.

Northern Ireland was devastated by three decades of sectarian violence in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s.

…read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at Fox World News

British gay marriage bill clears crucial hurdle

The first gay marriages in England and Wales are set to take place in 2014 after the legislation passed through parliament’s upper chamber the House of Lords on Monday.

Jubilant gay rights activists cheered outside parliament as the bill cleared unopposed, while gay lawmaker Lord Waheed Ali told colleagues in an emotional speech: “My life and many others will be better today than it was yesterday.”

The government-backed legislation now passes back to the lower House of Commons for final debates on Tuesday, but they are expected to be little more than a formality.

A spokesman for the culture ministry, which is overseeing the legislation, said the bill would probably receive official assent from Queen Elizabeth II, the head of state, on Wednesday or Thursday.

“But we are looking at seeing the first gay weddings in the middle of 2014 because there are various issues to sort out, such as its impact on pensions,” the spokesman told AFP.

Supporters of the bill in the House of Lords wore pink carnations, while gay marriage activists danced outside the Houses of Parliament.

Gay rights activists have vowed to press on for equal marriage in Britain’s other constituent nations, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg said the new law would ensure that lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people felt “recognised and valued, not excluded”.

The legislation represents “the kind of open, modern, tolerant and diverse society we want Britain to be in the 21st century”, he added.

But opponents of gay marriage warned that the legislation would “come back to bite” Prime Minister David Cameron.

The Coalition for Marriage campaign group said it would mobilise a 700,000-strong support base ahead of next year’s European elections and the general election in 2015.

The bill survived despite opposition from dozens of members of Cameron’s own Conservative party, and an attempt to kill it off with a “wrecking amendment” in the Lords last month failed.

Veteran gay rights campaigner Peter Tatchell said it was “a defeat for discrimination and a victory for love and marriage”.

“It is of huge symbolic importance, signalling that same-sex love has social recognition, acceptance and parity,” he said.

Gay couples in Britain have had the right to enter into a civil partnership since 2005, giving them identical rights and responsibilities to straight couples in a civil marriage.

But campaigners point to some differences such as international recognition, which applies to marriage but not partnerships.

The new law will ban the established Churches of England and Wales — which are opposed to gay marriage — from conducting ceremonies.

Other religious institutions will be able to “opt in” if they wish.

Scotland and Northern Ireland have their own laws on the matter.

The Scottish government published its own same-sex marriage bill last month, but Northern Ireland’s assembly voted to block a similar measure.

…read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at Fox World News

Readout of the Vice President’s Calls on Support for Building a United Community in Northern Ireland

By The White House

The Vice President spoke with First Minister Robinson and Deputy First Minister McGuinness of Northern Ireland today to welcome the launch of an All-Party Group process to address sensitive issues such as parades and protests; flags, symbols and emblems; and dealing with the past. Underscoring the importance of the All-Party process, the Vice President expressed his deep concern at parade-related violence and attacks on police, and supported calls for calm and respect for rule of law.

The Vice President also spoke with the chair of the All-Party Group process, former U.S. Special Envoy to Northern Ireland Dr. Richard Haass, to pledge the full support of the United States and his personal support in this vital effort. The Vice President and the U.S. Government, along with the British and Irish governments, will stay in close touch with Dr. Haass as he assists the political parties of Northern Ireland in the crucial work of healing the divisions of the past and building a truly shared future.

As the President said in Belfast in June, the people and institutions of Northern Ireland should be commended for the tremendous progress since the 1998 Good Friday Agreement. However, more work remains. Tackling sensitive issues are essential to creating a lasting peace and assuring the road to prosperity for all in Northern Ireland. It will require political courage, creativity, and compromise on the part of all Northern Ireland’s political parties. We welcome the launch of the All-Party process as a necessary step toward building a united community.

…read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at The White House Press Office

Benefits cap introduced across Britain

A cap on the amount of benefits households can claim is being rolled out across England, Scotland and Wales from Monday as part of a major government overhaul of welfare.

Under the changes, couples and single parents of working age will be entitled to no more than ??500 a week in benefits, including jobseekers allowance, housing and child benefits, while single people can receive up to ??350 a week.

The changes aim to ensure that people on benefits do not earn more than the average working family.

The government says the reforms will encourage more people back into work but critics argue that they will unfairly hit larger families and say they fail to take into account regional differences in the cost of living.

The cap, which does not apply in Northern Ireland, has been in place in the London boroughs of Haringey, Enfield, Croydon and Bromley since April.

Defending the changes, Work and Pensions Secretary Iain Duncan Smith said the reforms had already led to more people returning to work in those areas.

“A very, very significant number have gone out to work; in fact, what the Jobcentre staff have told us as we have been going round is that they have seen a genuine increase since they have alerted people to the fact that they are likely to be in the cap,” he told the BBC.

“This is both about saving money and, more particularly, about changing a culture that had left families, particularly large families, finding it easy and a reality for their lives to stay out of work on taxpayers’ benefits.”

The cap will incorporate a whole range of benefits, including the new Universal Credit for jobseekers and those on low incomes, being rolled out nationally from October as part of the shake-up.

…read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at Fox World News

Call for calm as Belfast suffers third night of trouble

Northern Ireland’s First Minister Peter Robinson has called for peace as riots erupted in Belfast for the third night running, injuring a police officer.

Seven officers were injured on Saturday after being attacked with petrol bombs by Protestant rioters in the Northern Irish capital, a spokeswoman said.

“It’s very important that this violence stops,” said Robinson.

“It’s very important that cool heads prevail in these circumstances and I hope people will obey the announcement and statement by the Orange Institution that people should desist from violence.

“The only kind of protest that is ever justifiable is a lawful and peaceful protest,” he added.

The Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) said one officer had been injured in Sunday’s clashes.

Bricks, bottles, furniture and other missiles were hurled on Saturday night by hooded youths, some with British flags covering their faces.

The seven officers injured on Saturday did not require hospital treatment and remained on duty.

On Friday night, 32 officers were injured and a leading politician was knocked unconscious by a brick.

About a thousand police officers from mainland Britain were sent to Northern Ireland in anticipation of tensions over the traditional Twelfth of July parades, the pinnacle of the Protestant Orange Order’s marching season.

Trouble flared Friday after police tried to enforce a decision by an adjudication body banning the Orange Order from marching through a Catholic republican area of Belfast.

“The scenes were both shameful and disgraceful,” Chief Constable Matt Baggott of the PSNI told reporters on Saturday.

He criticised leaders in the Orange Order who had called for protests against the decision to block their march through the republican Ardoyne area, saying they had been “reckless”.

Nigel Dodds, the member of parliament for North Belfast, was taken to hospital after being hit on the head with a brick while trying to calm the crowds down on Friday night. He was later discharged.

The July 12 parade marks the victory of Protestant king William III of Orange over the deposed Catholic king James II at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690.

It is a flashpoint for tensions between the Protestant and Catholic communities in the province, which was devastated by three decades of sectarian violence in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s.

The 1998 Good Friday peace accords largely brought an end to the unrest, known as The Troubles, although sporadic violence and bomb threats continue.

…read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at Fox World News

Belfast police attacked in second night of riots

Police in Belfast were attacked with petrol bombs in a second night of violence by Protestant rioters in the Northern Irish capital.

Bricks, bottles, furniture and other missiles were also hurled on Saturday following riots that left 32 officers injured and a politician hospitalised on Friday.

Hooded youths, some with British flags covering their faces, were involved in the clashes in the north of the city.

Police responded by firing baton rounds and deploying water cannon.

The unrest was not as intense as on Friday night, when crowds attacked police with petrol bombs, sticks, fireworks, bricks, bottles, masonry and even a sword.

More than 600 police from mainland Britain had been sent to Northern Ireland in anticipation of tensions over the traditional Twelfth of July parades, the pinnacle of the Protestant Orange Order’s marching season.

A further 400 were sent for Saturday following riots the night before.

Trouble flared Friday after police tried to enforce a decision by an adjudication body banning the Orange Order from marching through a Catholic republican area of Belfast.

“The scenes were both shameful and disgraceful,” Chief Constable Matt Baggott of the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) told reporters.

He criticised leaders in the Orange Order who had called for protests against the decision to block their march through the republican Ardoyne area.

“Some of their language was emotive and having called thousands of people to protest they had no plan and no control,” Baggott said.

“Rather than being responsible, I think the word for that is reckless.”

The PSNI said 32 officers were injured in Friday night’s violence. Leading Protestant politician Nigel Dodds was taken to hospital after being hit on the head with a brick and knocked out.

Dodds, who represents North Belfast in the British parliament, had been trying to calm the crowds down. He was discharged from hospital early on Saturday.

The July 12 parade marks the victory of Protestant king William III of Orange over the deposed Catholic king James II at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690.

It is a flashpoint for tensions between the Protestant and Catholic communities in the province, which was devastated by three decades of sectarian violence in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s.

The 1998 Good Friday peace accords largely brought an end to the unrest, known as The Troubles, although sporadic violence and bomb threats continue.

…read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at Fox World News

N. Ireland police reinforced after night of riots

Hundreds of extra police were deployed to Northern Ireland on Saturday following a night of rioting in Belfast that left 32 officers injured and a politician hospitalised.

More than 600 police from other parts of Britain had been sent to the province in anticipation of tensions over the traditional Twelfth of July parades, the pinnacle of the Protestant Orange Order’s marching season.

A police spokesman said a further 400 were due to arrive on Saturday following the riots, in which crowds attacked police with petrol bombs, sticks, fireworks, bricks, bottles, masonry and even a sword.

Trouble flared after police tried to enforce a decision by an adjudication body banning the Orange Order from marching through a Catholic republican area of Belfast.

“The scenes were both shameful and disgraceful,” Chief Constable Matt Baggott of the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) told reporters.

He criticised leaders in the Orange Order who had called for protests against the decision to block their march through the republican Ardoyne area.

“Some of their language was emotive and having called thousands of people to protest they had no plan and no control,” Baggott said.

“Rather than being responsible, I think the word for that is reckless.”

The PSNI said 32 officers were injured in Friday night’s violence, while leading Protestant politician Nigel Dodds was taken to hospital after being hit on the head with a brick.

Dodds, a member of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), was knocked unconcious as he tried to urge the rioters to calm down. He was discharged from hospital early on Saturday.

Northern Ireland First Minister Peter Robinson, the DUP leader who shares power in the government with the Catholic Sinn Fein, urged “cool heads to prevail at this time”.

“Violence is undermining a just cause and runs totally against the wishes of the Orange Order for protest to be entirely peaceful,” he said in a statement.

The July 12 parade marks the victory of Protestant king William III of Orange over the deposed Catholic king James II at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690.

It is a flashpoint for tensions between the Protestant and Catholic communities in the British-ruled province, which was devastated by three decades of sectarian violence in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s.

The 1998 Good Friday peace accords largely brought an end to the unrest, known as The Troubles, although sporadic violence and bomb threats continue.

…read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at Fox World News

Leading politician knocked out in Belfast riots

A leading Northern Irish politician was knocked unconscious by a thrown missile as sectarian tensions spilled over into rioting in Belfast at the climax of the Protestant marching season.

Nigel Dodds, the deputy leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) — the province’s pro-British, Protestant, conservative largest party — was rushed to hospital Friday after being hit in the clashes between Protestant loyalists and riot police.

It followed a day of what had been peaceful Twelfth of July parades across Northern Ireland, the pinnacle of Orange Order loyalists’ marching season.

Rioting Protestants, some wielding swords, attacked police at a roadblock across the loyalist marchers’ preferred route through north Belfast.

Petrol bombs, sticks, fireworks, bricks, bottles, beer cans, drain pipes, and part of a wall were hurled at police, with teenagers among the rioters.

Shirtless men, and others in football tops, attacked police vehicles and officers in riot gear.

Loyalist bandsmen played sectarian tunes.

Around 20 plastic bullets were fired and water cannon used by police. Seven officers were injured, at least three of them knocked unconscious.

Dodds has represented North Belfast in the British parliament since 2001. He had been urging people to desist from violence at the roadblock.

The BBC reported a man who treated Dodds at the scene as saying: “He grasped his head as he went down. He was knocked out cold. I put him in the recovery position and checked his airway.

“He was unlucky because he was also hit by water cannon as I was trying to administer first aid and he got soaked.”

The July 12 parade is the culmination of the Orange Order’s marching season, and is usually accompanied by violence. The day is a public holiday in Northern Ireland.

The march marks the Protestant king William III’s victory at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690 over the deposed Catholic king James II.

The marchers like to stick to traditional routes but there are often clashes as they sometimes pass through what have now become Catholic areas.

The violence broke out following a decision to bar loyalists from walking through a contested flashpoint area where Catholic republicans have gathered in the past to attack police.

Northern Ireland’s First Minister Peter Robinson, the DUP leader, appealed for “cool heads”.

“Violence and attacks on the Police Service of Northern Ireland and the wider community are wrong, can never be justified and must stop,” he said.

“Those who are using the cover of protest to attack the police are massively damaging the cause they support.”

Around 3,500 people died in the three decades of sectarian violence between Northern Ireland’s Catholics and Protestants that largely ended with a 1998 peace agreement, though sporadic unrest and bomb threats continue.

…read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at Fox World News

Sinn Fein chief testifies vs. brother in rape case

Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams is testifying in a Belfast court against his brother, who is charged with raping his own daughter.

The long-delayed case has raised awkward questions for the Irish nationalist party, because Adams admits he knew for decades about the criminal allegations but didn’t tell police. That reflected Sinn Fein‘s traditional hostility to law enforcement agencies in the British territory of Northern Ireland.

Adams testified Monday that his niece Aine told him of abuse allegations in 1987 when she was 14. He said he confronted his brother in 2000, when his brother admitted one act of abuse.

Liam Adams denies 10 counts of rape, indecent assault and gross indecency from 1977 to 1983. He fled to the Republic of Ireland in 2009 but was extradited in 2011.

From: http://feeds.foxnews.com/~r/foxnews/world/~3/D1wnVKSSq1Y/

Real IRA founder loses appeal on terror conviction

Ireland’s highest appellate court has rejected a bid by the founder of the Real IRA paramilitary group to have his 2003 conviction for “directing terror” overturned.

Lawyers for Michael McKevitt had argued that the 63-year-old should be freed from prison because the warrant used to search his home was illegal, and because McKevitt himself fired his lawyers midway through his original trial.

But the three-judge court ruled Friday that McKevitt’s complaint was “unstateable and unarguable.”

McKevitt received a 20-year prison sentence chiefly based on testimony from an American spy who passed information to British and U.S. law enforcement agents.

The Real IRA opposes Northern Ireland‘s 1998 peace settlement. That year the group killed 29 people with a car bomb in Omagh, the deadliest blast of the entire conflict.

From: http://feeds.foxnews.com/~r/foxnews/world/~3/5EpT5OERB9c/

Medieval murder mystery

By hnn

Archaeologists have uncovered the body of a woman who may be at the centre of a 600-year-old murder mystery.

The find, as well as 4,000 other artefacts hidden within a medieval and long-forgotten settlement, only came to light during the development of a section of road in Northern Ireland.

For the last ten months excavators have been amassing numerous items taken from the site, which will now be preserved and hopefully one day displayed to the public….

Source:
The Daily Mail (UK)

Source URL:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2308975/600-year-old-murder-mystery-skeleton-woman-buried-outside-traditional-graveyards.html

Date:
4-14-13

From: http://hnn.us/articles/medieval-murder-mystery