Tag Archives: Saarland University

'Promising' blood test discovered for Alzheimer's dementia

Researchers in Germany have identified a new blood test that may in future provide much earlier diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease and other degenerative disorders. The team, from Saarland University and Siemens Healthcare, describe their test in the open access journal Genome Biology… …read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at Medical News Today

Controlling friction by tuning van der Waals forces

For a car to accelerate there has to be friction between the tire and the surface of the road. The amount of friction generated depends on numerous factors, including the minute intermolecular forces acting between the two surfaces in contact – so-called van der Waals forces. The importance of these intermolecular interactions in generating friction has long been known, but has now been demonstrated experimentally for the first time by a research team led by Physics Professor Karin Jacobs from Saarland University and Professor Roland Bennewitz from the Leibniz Institute for New Materials (INM). Interestingly, the research team has shown that the friction acting at a material surface is influenced by the structure of the sub-surface layers. …read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at Phys.org

Researchers discover new retroviruses in polar bear 'Knut' and panda 'Bao Bao'

Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are viruses that at some point in the past inserted themselves into the nuclear genome of a host’s germ cell. Once integrated in a germ cell the virus would be passed on from one generation to the next and the endogenous retroviral genome would therefore be inherited to new species that evolve from the original host. ‘ERV sequences and fragments make up about eight per cent of the human genome,’ explains Professor Jens Mayer from the Department of Human Genetics at Saarland University. Endogenous retroviruses are found not only in humans, but also in other mammals such as horses, cattle, apes, koalas and, as has now been shown, in polar bears and giant pandas. …read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at Phys.org

New sensor cable enables remote monitoring of miles of perimeter fencing

Airports, nuclear power stations, industrial and research sites, or even your own garden – there are many places that need to be protected against unauthorized access, and often protection is required 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Up until now, the sheer length of the perimeter to be protected and the high costs involved made this sort of protection impossible at many sites. Working in collaboration with a number of companies, research scientists at Saarland University have developed a new type of surveillance technology that enables extended perimeters to be monitored and protected at low cost. The new technology is based on magnetometers (magnetic field sensors) that can be incorporated within smart cables of essentially any length. These cables can themselves be installed into fencing or roadways. The research team is presenting its innovative technology at the major international technology fair Hannover Messe from April 8th to April 12th (Stand C 40, Hall 2 ‒ Saarland Research and Innovation Stand). …read more
Source: FULL ARTICLE at Phys.org

Automatic test procedures for apps on smartphones and tablets

For many so-called apps, developers and companies have not adequately ensured that the mini-programs are actually working the way they should. Therefore, computer scientists at Saarland University developed software which tests apps for the Android operating system automatically. From Mar. 5th at the computer expo Cebit in Hannover, the researchers will present how they discover failures even in popular and widespread apps by using their method. A robot arm will click itself through arbitrary apps to find their failures. …read more
Source: FULL ARTICLE at Phys.org