Tag Archives: Genome Biology

'Promising' blood test discovered for Alzheimer's dementia

Researchers in Germany have identified a new blood test that may in future provide much earlier diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease and other degenerative disorders. The team, from Saarland University and Siemens Healthcare, describe their test in the open access journal Genome Biology… …read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at Medical News Today

Researchers help unlock pine beetle's Pandora's box

(Phys.org) —Twenty researchers—more than half of them Simon Fraser University graduates and/or faculty—could become eastern Canada‘s knights in shining white lab coats. A paper detailing their newly created sequencing of the mountain pine beetle’s (MPB) genome will be gold in the hands of scientists trying to stem the beetle’s invasion into eastern forests. The journal Genome Biology has published the paper. …read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at Phys.org

Getting under the shell of the turtle genome

The genome of the western painted turtle (Chrysemys picta bellii) one of the most widespread, abundant and well-studied turtles in the world, is published this week in Genome Biology. The data show that, like turtles themselves, the rate of genome evolution is extremely slow; turtle genomes evolve at a rate that is about a third that of the human genome and a fifth that of the python, the fastest lineage analyzed. …read more
Source: FULL ARTICLE at Phys.org

Pining for a beetle genome

The sequencing and assembly of the genome of the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae, is published online this week in Genome Biology. The species is native to North America, where it is currently wreaking havoc in an area of forest ten times larger than previous outbreaks. This paper determines genes that may be involved in colonizing the trees, such as enzymes for degrading plant cell walls, and identifies potential sex chromosomes in the beetle. …read more
Source: FULL ARTICLE at Phys.org

Wasp transcriptome creates a buzz

New research delivers a sting in the tail for queen wasps. Scientists have sequenced the active parts of the genome – or transcriptome – of primitively eusocial wasps to identify the part of the genome that makes you a queen or a worker. Their work, published in BioMed Central’s open access journal Genome Biology, shows that workers have a more active transcriptome than queens. This suggests that in these simple societies, workers may be the ‘jack-of-all-trades’ in the colony – transcriptionally speaking – leaving the queen with a somewhat restricted repertoire. …read more
Source: FULL ARTICLE at Phys.org