Tag Archives: Focus Electric

EV Price War: Ford Slashes Focus Electric Price by $4000, Now Starts at $35,995

By Nick Palermo

Ford is lowering the price of its all-electric version of the Focus, cutting the price by $4000 to $35,995. The reduction is further evidence of a price war in the EV market, following the announcement of lower pricing and/or special lease rates for electrics such as the Nissan Leaf, Honda Fit EV, and Fiat 500E, as well as the plug-in hybrid Chevrolet Volt. Ford says the move is intended to make the electric Focus, which is available nationwide, more appealing to customers considering a plug-in vehicle.

The Nissan Leaf is still the most affordable of the aforementioned models, with a starting price of $29,650. It’s also among the most efficient, rated at 115 MPGe in combined city/highway driving. Range for the all-electric Nissan, though, is the lowest in this group at 75 miles. The Focus Electric, by comparison, ekes out one more mile of range despite a lower combined efficiency rating of 105 MPGe.

The $32,600 Fiat 500E is available only in California. The 500E can travel 87 miles on electricity alone and is rated at 116 MPGe combined. The Honda Fit EV, meanwhile, is rated at 118 MPGe combined and has a driving range of 82 miles. It’s priced at $37,415, although it is offered as a lease only. Currently, the Fit EV is available in California, Oregon, New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Maryland, Rhode Island, and Connecticut.

The Focus Electric now matches the price of the plug-in hybrid Chevrolet Volt, which is available at $35,995 for cash buyers and $36,995 if it’s leased or financed through Ally Financial or Wells Fargo. And although the Volt relieves so-called range anxiety by backing up its battery power with a gas engine, it has a limited electric-only range of 38 miles. On battery power alone, the Volt is rated at 98 MPGe combined; once the gas engine takes over, combined fuel economy is 37 mpg. Chevy recently added the all-electric Spark EV to its lineup, but smaller and priced at $27,495, The Spark EV is not a direct competitor to the Focus Electric. The Spark EV’s availability remains limited to Oregon and California.



With EVs commanding less than 1 percent of U.S. market share, automakers are anxious to incentivize sales. Ford addresses some of the driving public’s reluctance to go electric with this price drop, and, as with all EVs, the Focus Electric’s price can potentially be even lower when eligible buyers take advantage of any federal, state, and local tax credits and incentives that are available to them. Concerns about range and long-term reliability, however, still remain considerable obstacles for many would-be EV drivers.

…read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at Car & Driver

Has Obama's Electric Car Revolution Failed?

By John Rosevear, The Motley Fool

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Last Friday’s news that Fisker Automotive would lay off 75% of its staff after failing to find a buyer was yet another blow to the Obama administration’s efforts to foster an electrified automotive future.

Fisker received $193 million in U.S. government money, and produced some 2,500 cars – but it never came close to turning a profit, and its short history was marked by a long series of missteps.

Electric cars haven’t exactly taken the market by storm. President Obama‘s onetime goal of having 1 million electric cars on U.S. roads by 2015 now looks like a pipe dream. Was this whole idea misguided from the start?

Fisker wasn’t even building proper electric cars
In a way, Fisker’s failure isn’t a fair test. Despite receiving millions from a Department of Energy loan program, Fisker’s car, a luxury sedan called the Karma, wasn’t even a true electric car, or BEV (for “battery electric vehicle”). Instead, it was a plug-in hybrid, a term that means a conventional gas-electric hybrid that can be plugged in to charge the batteries.

Plug-in hybrids can typically go a short distance without using any gas at all. That was a cutting-edge idea when the Karma was first shown way back in 2008. But nowadays, plug-in hybrids are pretty mainstream: Toyota‘s popular Prius comes in a plug-in version, as do the hybrid versions of Ford‘s Fusion and C-Max and a number of other cars.

Several of the mass-market automakers also offer (or plan to offer) pure electric BEVs. Nissan‘s LEAF is probably the best-known, but there are a few others. Ford offers an electric version of its Focus compact, and General Motors will roll out an electric version of its tiny Chevy Spark in a few markets later this year.

The problem with electric cars
The LEAF and those other BEVs were introduced with much fanfare over the last few years. But the LEAF has missed its sales goals, and the Focus Electric has sold just over a thousand examples in its year-plus on the market – next to none, in other words, in the grand scheme of things.

There are several problems with electric cars – a lack of recharging stations is one – but a big obstacle is that the batteries are still too expensive. By mass-market standards, that means that electric cars that have enough batteries to give a decent range are too expensive for what they are. Or put another way, why pay almost $40,000 for an electric Focus when you can get a more useable gas-powered version for half of that?

That’s something that the government hasn’t yet figured out how to fix. But the only company that seems to be succeeding with electric cars so far, Tesla Motors , has figured out how to work around it.

Does Tesla’s success show that electric cars are only for the rich?
As far as pure electric cars go, Tesla’s Model S is as …read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at DailyFinance

Report: Ford Focus EV's slow sales trigger massive incentives

By Zach Bowman

Filed under: , , , ,

2013 Ford Focus Electric  - front three-quarter view

The Detroit News reports Ford is having real trouble moving its new Focus Electric. As a result, the automaker is offering substantial incentives in an attempt to lure in more buyers. How substantial? Try $10,750 off of a three-year lease. What’s more, the EV can now be had for $37,995 ($2,000 less than its original base price) on top of an additional $2,000 cash discount to buy the EV outright – or you can opt for 1.9-percent financing if you work through Ford Motor Credit. None of which factors in various potential government incentives. Last year, Ford managed to sell a paltry 685 of the 1,627 Focus EV hatchbacks it built.

Ford isn’t alone in trying to woo more buyers to its EV effort. Nissan cut the price of its Leaf by a whopping 18 percent for 2013, now down to $28,800 and built in the USA. The move followed the automaker’s substantial incentives in 2012.

If you want a Focus Electric, you can now apparently get your hands on one for as little as $285 per month with $930 due at signing for a 36-month lease with 10,500 miles per year.

Ford Focus EV’s slow sales trigger massive incentives originally appeared on Autoblog on Fri, 25 Jan 2013 15:45:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Source: FULL ARTICLE at Autoblog

Report: <i>Consumer Reports</i>: Ford Fusion fun but flawed; Mitsubishi i-MiEV slow, chintzy [w/videos]

By Jeffrey N. Ross

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2013 Ford Fusion - front three-quarter view

Waiting for a Ford compliment from Consumer Reports these days is like waiting for a low-cost new product from Apple. So we weren’t really expecting a glowing review of the 2013 Ford Fusion when CR got its hands on the car. The institute’s crew bought three different versions of the Fusion (Hybrid, 1.6-liter EcoBoost and a Titanium with the 2.0-liter EcoBoost) to put through its barrage of tests, and while we aren’t too surprised by some of the findings, they’re still interesting nonetheless.

Mitsubishi i - front three-quarter view, studio imageCR praises the Fusion for its “eye-catching” design and says that the sportier Titanium trim level is the best-handling midsize sedan they’ve ever tested, but that’s about where the good news ends for Ford. The Fusion Hybrid also posted the best-ever fuel economy CR has recorded in a midsize sedan, but the only problem is that their number was 39 miles per gallon combined – far less than Ford’s 47 mpg rating for city, highway and combined. As expected, CR also dinged the Fusion for its MyFord Touch, but some of the other gripes about the car include a cramped cabin and poor fit and finish.

Other Ford products tested this time around include the Focus Electric and C-Max Hybrid. Like the Fusion, CR‘s observed fuel economy of 37 mpg for the C-Max fell well short of Ford’s advertised 47-mpg rating, and both cars were criticized for the use of MyFord Touch. CR notes that the Focus Electric‘s interior is also cramped, with the battery pack taking up a lot of cargo space.

In other news, CR slams the Mitsubishi i-MiEV electric car rather mercilessly, something that is perhaps less surprising. The institute digs into the low-cost urban runabout for its lack of speed, payload, and chintzy finish, among other things.

You can check out videos about the Fusion Hybrid, Focus Electric and i-MiEV by scrolling below.

Continue reading Consumer Reports: Ford Fusion fun but flawed; Mitsubishi i-MiEV slow, chintzy [w/videos]

Consumer Reports: Ford Fusion fun but flawed; Mitsubishi i-MiEV slow, chintzy [w/videos] originally appeared on Autoblog on Wed, 23 Jan 2013 16:31:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Source: FULL ARTICLE at Autoblog