Tag Archives: PIA

Roadster batteries likely to perform better than Tesla predicts

By Sebastian Blanco

orange tesla roadster with lightwriting

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Once the epitome of EV cool, the Tesla Roadster has kind of taken a back seat to the new electric vehicles in the market it helped spawn. Turns out, even in the background, the Roadster has things to teach us. Or, at least it does to the experts at Plug In America who recently took a closer look at the EV’s battery pack.

See, in 2006, when the Roadster was new, Tesla said the Roadster’s 53-kWh lithium-ion battery pack – good for 244 miles of range when new – would have 70 percent of its capacity after five years or 50,000 miles. With plenty of “old” Roadsters on the road, PIA studied four percent of the packs out there today and discovered that the packs have an “average of 80- to 85-percent of capacity after 100,000 miles driven.” The numbers were self-reported to PIA’s website by Roadster owners in a project that started in January.

The numbers come from PIA’s chief science officer, Tom Saxton, who conducted the first-ever independent assessment and announced the results at the recent Teslive Tesla users conference. According to a statement, he said, “Our study also found no discernable effect of climate on battery-pack longevity. Roadster owners in hot climates are not seeing noticeably different battery capacity profiles than owners in moderate climates.” Last year, PIA surveyed Nissan Leaf owners and discovered that hot climates were affecting the packs more than expected. Surveys on the first-generation Toyota RAV4 EV and Tesla Model S are underway.

Continue reading Roadster batteries likely to perform better than Tesla predicts

Roadster batteries likely to perform better than Tesla predicts originally appeared on Autoblog Green on Mon, 15 Jul 2013 14:29:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Source: FULL ARTICLE at Autoblog

Social Security’s Huge Obscure Incentive To Keep Working

By Breaking News

Social Security Administration 2 SC Social Securitys Huge Obscure Incentive To Keep Working

I just turned 62, but feel 42 and, according to my kids, act like 12. I have a great job, perhaps the best job in the world. I’m an economics professor and get to teach, consult, write, advise governments, and run my personal finance software company. Each of these “jobs” is more fun than the next. For me retirement, as in no longer doing these jobs, would be work. I’d have to work very hard to find things as entertaining.

I realize I’m extraordinarily lucky. Simply being employed is a big deal these days. Being healthy enough to work late in life is another huge gift. And, the icing of doing something you love, well, it’s on the cake.

How long do I intend to “work”? Hopefully, right up to my last day. And, as if I didn’t have enough good reasons to work, Social Security offers me a significant incentive for doing so. The longer I work, the larger will be my Social Security benefits. This is due to Social Security’s Recomputation of Benefits provision.

Each year you work, you add to your earnings record leading Social Security to automatically recalculate your benefits. The gory details are available on the SSA website.

In a nutshell, Social Security averages your highest 35 years of earnings to figure your Average Indexed Monthly Earnings or AIME. Then it plugs your AIME into a formula that figures out your full retirement benefit, called your Primary Insurance Amount (PIA). What benefits you can get for yourself and your spouse (including your ex spouse(s)) and children, if they are young enough or are disabled) is all hooked to your PIA.

Read More at forbes.com .By Laurence Kotlikoff.

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Source: FULL ARTICLE at Western Journalism

Social Security's Huge Obscure Incentive to Keep Working

By Laurence Kotlikoff, Contributor I just turned 62, but feel 42 and, according to my kids, act like 12.  I have a great job, perhaps the best job in the world.  I’m an economics professor and get to teach, consult, write, advise governments, and run my personal finance software company.  Each of these “jobs” is more fun than the next.  For me retirement, as in no longer doing these jobs, would be work.  I’d have to work very hard to find things as entertaining. I realize I’m extraordinarily lucky.  Simply being employed is a big deal these days.  Being healthy enough to work late in life is another huge gift.  And, the icing of doing something you love, well, it’s on the cake. How long do I intend to “work”?  Hopefully, right up to my last day.  And, as if I didn’t have enough good reasons to work, Social Security offers me a significant incentive for doing so.  The longer I work, the larger will be my Social Security benefits.  This is due to Social Security‘sRecomputation of Benefits provision. Each year you work, you add to your earnings record leading Social Security to automatically recalculate your benefits.  The gory details are here: http://www.ssa.gov/oact/cola/Benefits.html. In a nutshell, Social Security averages your highest 35 years of earnings to figure your Average Indexed Monthly Earnings or AIME.  Then it plugs your AIME into a formula that figures out your full retirement benefit, called your Primary Insurance Amount (PIA). What benefits you can get for yourself and your spouse (including your ex spouse(s)) and children, if they are young enough or are disabled) is all hooked to your PIA. Social Security considers all your covered earnings from age 16 on and indexes, based on historic wage growth, all earnings through the year you are age 60.  Earnings after age 60 are just treated at face value.  So if you are now, say, 65, are still working, and you started work at 16, you have 45 years of indexed earnings and 4 years of non-indexed earnings.  Social Security then takes the 35 largest of these values to compute your AIME. If your current earnings are above the smallest of the 35 (ignoring this year’s earnings) being used to form the AIME, bingo!  You’ll raise your AIME, which will raise your PIA, which will raise your Social Security check (checks, if your dependents are also collecting). Is this a big deal?  Well, I just looked at my own situation using my company’s software — Maximize My Social Security (www.maximizemysocialsecurity.com).  I didn’t really start contributing much to Social Security until I was 29.  I was in grad school before then and on a postdoc after grad school.  If I were to stop working today and wait until 70 to collect benefits — when they would start at their highest value, my lifetime benefits would be $774,210.  (Lifetime benefits are calculated as the present value of benefits through age 100 discounted at a 3 percent rate above inflation.)  If I were to work until …read more
Source: FULL ARTICLE at Forbes Latest