Tag Archives: NEC

NEC ends smartphone development, will make no new models

NEC will introduce no new smartphones, and will make current models only to order, as it struggles to find the economies of scale required to compete in the market.

The Japanese company is ending the development, manufacturing and sale of new smartphones, it said in a statement Wednesday. It will continue to manufacture existing models to order, and to maintain and support them, a spokesman said.

NEC will continue developing and producing conventional mobile phones, and will also operate its tablets business.

Separately, the company reported larger losses in the second quarter, while sales remained almost flat year on year. Net sales were up 1.4 percent to ¥640 billion (US$6.4 billion) while losses increased to ¥21.5 billion from close to ¥18 billion in the same quarter last year.

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Source: FULL ARTICLE at PCWorld

HP, NEC to develop next-generation x86 servers

Hewlett Packard and Japan’s NEC will expand their existing partnership to develop high-end x86-based servers for cloud and Web applications.

The companies said Thursday they will team up to accelerate research on HP’s next generation of blade-based server systems, which the U.S. company is gradually introducing alongside its traditional Itanium Unix-based servers. They said their focus will be on creating x86 hardware that can run with the same reliability as the Unix products, which can then be employed in mission-critical roles running today’s social networks, mobile applications and cloud-based services.

HP is trying to catch up to rivals such as Amazon Web Services in the growing market for cloud services, while also stay competitive in hardware amid a general shift away from Unix. The company announced a strategy to pursue a hybrid cloud approach last year, based on a solution it is calling HP Converged Cloud. Last month it announced a new operating system for cloud computing, HP Cloud OS, built on the open-source hosting software platform OpenStack, but said initially the new OS will only run on its own hardware.

The new partnership will aim to speed up the development of HP’s Project Odyssey, which it first announced in 2011. The project is an attempt to integrate x86 server blades running Windows or Linux with its Itanium-based server lineup based on Unix. NEC said the companies will specifically focus on a system that HP has been developing for years called “DragonHawk,” which is supposed to be able to incorporate both types of servers into a single cabinet but has been slow to materialize.

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Source: FULL ARTICLE at PCWorld

NXP Semiconductors Wants Cars to Talk to Each Other

By Rich Duprey, The Motley Fool

Filed under:

It might seem like something out of Terminator: Rise of the Machines, but in an effort to make the roads safer as well as more efficient to travel upon, NXP Semiconductors is imagining a future where cars communicate not only with one another but with the road and environment around them.

Talk to me
Through a consortium of companies including car manufacturers like Honda and Audi, along with technology partners such as mapmaker TomTom, NEC, and TE Connectivity, as well as a number of universities and research institutes, NXP is looking to implement and deploy a wireless communications network between cars and the highway infrastructure around them.

For example, the technology would allow cars to communicate with one another and could  essentially “see” around corners to detect danger even before it was visible to the driver, or to warn of traffic jams or approaching emergency vehicles. 

Just last week the chip maker perhaps best known for its leadership in near-field communications signed a memorandum of understanding with one of the consortium partners, Cohda Wireless, to create a cooperative intelligent transportation system in Europe. In January, NXP and Cisco  announced  a significant investment in Cohda Wireless to develop a similar system in the U.S. The Transportation Department has been running a test in Michigan since last August testing vehicle awareness in more than 2,800 cars.

The Internet of Things
According to Cisco, more devices, appliances, and even cattle are connecting to the Internet than people (farmers can track the health of their “networked cows” via technology developed by Dutch start-up Sparked). In fact, the Internet became an “Internet of Things” as far back as 2008 when there were more devices connected than people on the Earth. Cisco predicts some 25 billion devices will be connected by 2015, and 50 billion by 2020.

NXP and Cohda have developed a wireless communication system that will complement Cisco’s “Internet of Things” infrastructure using Cohda’s 802.11p technology. That’s an amendment to the Wi-Fi LAN standard but designed specifically for automotive applications.

“Roadlink” will be the branded named of the new NXP and Cohda technology used for marketing a total car-to-X communication and security system for on-board units and road-side units in the intelligent transportation system of the future. Automotive-ready modules based on Roadlink are currently being developed by companies such as lesswire AG in Germany. The first C2X module from lesswire is expected to be available in 2015.

Cart before the horse?
Because it’s a consortium that’s developing the system, it will become a complete end-to-end solution right from the get-go and avoiding many of the chicken-or-egg scenarios that have plagued a number of technological advances, such as natural gas cars: Do you develop the refueling infrastructure first so that cars have a place to fill up, or do you make the cars first to prove there is demand to necessitate the expense to build the infrastructure?

Car-to-X has the potential to create vehicles that are more than simply passive receptacles through which information passes, but rather part of an active, holistic network where the very …read more

Source: FULL ARTICLE at DailyFinance

LTSI v3.4 Released

By Noriaki

Part of supporting the demand for Linux in consumer electronics is ensuring there is a common Linux base that is maintained and supported for the typical lifetime of a consumer device, usually two years, and that supports a large variety of consumer electronics products. The Linux kernel is released at such a rapid pace that until now, device makers were doing significant back-porting, bug testing and driver development on their own, which carried substantial cost in terms of time-to-market, as well as development and engineering effort to maintain those custom kernels.

The Linux Foundation’s Consumer Electronics (CE) workgroup founded the Long Term Support Initiative (LTSI) to address this issue collaboratively. Today, the project provides for both an annual release of a Linux kernel suitable for supporting the lifespan of consumer electronics products and regular updates of those releases for two years. Linux kernel maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman oversees this maintenance and the LTSI kernel tree for this industry-wide project created and supported by Hitachi, LG Electronics, NEC, Panasonic, Qualcomm Atheros, Renesas Electronics Corporation, Samsung Electronics, Sony and Toshiba.

This week the CE working group is releasing the LTSI 3.4 kernel. It is based on the Linux 3.4.25 kernel release and includes a number of backported features from newer releases.

Highlights from today’s release include:

* The Contiguous Memory Allocator (CMA), which is extremely useful for embedded devices that have very limited hardware resources and will better handle the large memory requirements of multimedia applications. CMA originally was merged into the 3.4.0 kernel release, but its functionality was quite limited. Since then, the feature has been significantly improved in the kernel.org releases and those fixes have been added to the LTSI 3.4 kernel release. For more information about this kernel option, please visit LWN.net.

* AF_BUS, a kernel-based implementation of the D-Bus protocol. This feature was created for systems that required a faster D-Bus speed than the existing userspace method could provide, specifically the automotive entertainment systems. For more information about this feature, please see LWN.net.

* CoDel (controlled delay), a transmission algorithm that optimizes TCP/IP network buffer control, is backported for LTSI 3.4. This is a feature used to help control the “buffer bloat” problem that has been identified by the networking community as an issue that all devices need to be aware of. This feature was backported from the 3.5.0 kernel.org release. For more information about it, please see this LWN.net post.

Platform specific board support was backported from newer kernel versions, allowing the Armadillo 800, AT91, kzm9d, kzm9g, and Marzen platforms to work properly with this release.

For more information about LTSI and the latest release, please visit the LTSI website.

Source: FULL ARTICLE at Linux Foundation